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Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs in Peru, highland Bolivia, northwestern Argentina, and northeastern Chile (Woods and Kilpatrick, 2005). It occurs from around 3,000 to around 4,300 m asl (Dunnum, 2003; Emmons, 2001). It is not present in the Yungas of the eastern versant of the Andes or the lowlands of Bolivia (Dunnum, 2003).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is typically found in moist habitats with scattered rocks and close to dense riparian habitats (including boggy areas). In Peru the species lives in thick grass or brushy grasslands and disturbed gallery forest in which it makes distinct runways. It is present in both primary and disturbed habitats. In Argentina it has been reported to live in burrows with multiple entrances. In captivity the gestation period is 63.3 days, litters average 1.9 (range 1-4), and the average age of first reproduction is two months (Weir, 1974; Eisenberg and Redford, 1999).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 6.3 years (captivity)
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Dunnum, J., Patterson, B. & Zeballos, H. & Teta, P.

Reviewer/s
Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority) & Schipper, J. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining at a rate to qualify for inclusion in a threat category.
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Population

Population
It is considered a common species, although there are not many records from Argentina.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It has been recorded from 12 protected areas in Peru; it is present in at least two protected areas in Bolivia. No conservation measures are needed for this species.
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Wikipedia

Montane Guinea Pig

The Montane Guinea Pig, Cavia tschudii, is a guinea pig species from South America. It is found in Peru.

Peruvian wild guinea pigs were first described by E. T. Bennett in 1835, who termed them Cavia cutleri. Johann Jakob von Tschudi, in an 1845 publication, used the term Cavia cutleri to refer to what are now considered two separate entities - the first, Bennett's Cavia cutleri, which was later (by Oldfield Thomas in 1917) identified as probably a differently-pigmented version of Cavia porcellus, and the second, a wild Peruvian pig that was clearly different from the animal Bennett described.[3] In 1867[2], Leopold Fitzinger renamed the latter guinea pig Cavia tschudii.[3]

References

  1. ^ Dunnum, J., Patterson, B., Zeballos, H. & Teta, P. (2008). Cavia tschudii. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 5 January 2009.
  2. ^ a b Fitzinger, Leopold (1867). "Versuch einer natürlichen Anordnung der Nagethiere (Rodentia)". Sitzungsberichte der Kaiserlichen Akademie der Wissenschaft zu Wien (Mathematische-naturwissenschaftliche Classe) 55: 453-515; 56:57-168. Modern references commonly list this incorrectly as 1857.
  3. ^ a b Weir, Barbara J. (1974), "Notes on the Origin of the Domestic Guinea-Pig", in Rowlands, I. W.; Weir, Barbara J., The Biology of Hystricomorph Rodents, Academic Press, pp. pp. 437–446, ISBN 0-12-6133334-4 
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