Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Physical Description

Type Information

Type for Pelidnota tarsalis Casey, 1915
Catalog Number: USNM
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Entomology
Sex/Stage: Female; Adult
Preparation: Pinned
Locality: Peekskill, New York, United States
  • Type: Casey. A Review of the American Species of Rutelinae, Dynastinae and Cetoniinae. Memoirs on the Coleoptera VI. 74.
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Type for Pelidnota brevicollis Casey, 1915
Catalog Number: USNM
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Entomology
Sex/Stage: Male; Adult
Preparation: Pinned
Year Collected: 1902
Locality: Jacksonville, Florida, United States
  • Type: Casey. A Review of the American Species of Rutelinae, Dynastinae and Cetoniinae. Memoirs on the Coleoptera VI. 74.
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Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Type for Pelidnota ponderella Casey, 1915
Catalog Number: USNM
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Entomology
Sex/Stage: ; Adult
Preparation: Pinned
Locality: N.E. U.S., Unknown, United States
  • Type: Casey. A Review of the American Species of Rutelinae, Dynastinae and Cetoniinae. Memoirs on the Coleoptera VI. 73.
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Holotype for Pelidnota debiliceps Casey, 1915
Catalog Number: USNM
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Entomology
Sex/Stage: ; Adult
Preparation: Pinned
Locality: Atlantic City; N.J., New Jersey, United States
  • Holotype: Casey. A Review of the American Species of Rutelinae, Dynastinae and Cetoniinae. Memoirs on the Coleoptera VI. 73.
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Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Holotype for Pelidnota oblonga Casey, 1915
Catalog Number: USNM
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Entomology
Sex/Stage: ; Adult
Preparation: Pinned
Locality: La., Louisiana, United States
  • Holotype: Casey. A Review of the American Species of Rutelinae, Dynastinae and Cetoniinae. Memoirs on the Coleoptera VI. 73.
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Holotype for Pelidnota brevis Casey, 1915
Catalog Number: USNM
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Entomology
Sex/Stage: ; Adult
Preparation: Pinned
Locality: Brooklyn; New York, New York, United States
  • Holotype: Casey. A Review of the American Species of Rutelinae, Dynastinae and Cetoniinae. Memoirs on the Coleoptera VI. 72.
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Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Type for Pelidnota strenua Casey, 1915
Catalog Number: USNM
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Entomology
Sex/Stage: ; Adult
Preparation: Pinned
Collector(s): Unknown
Locality: St. Petersburg, Pinellas, Florida, United States
  • Type: Casey. A Review of the American Species of Rutelinae, Dynastinae and Cetoniinae. Memoirs on the Coleoptera VI. 72.
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Type for Pelidnota hudsonica Casey, 1915
Catalog Number: USNM
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Entomology
Sex/Stage: ; Adult
Preparation: Pinned
Locality: Peekskill, New York, United States
  • Type: Casey. A Review of the American Species of Rutelinae, Dynastinae and Cetoniinae. Memoirs on the Coleoptera VI. 74.
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Type for Pelidnota pallidipes Casey, 1915
Catalog Number: USNM
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Entomology
Sex/Stage: ; Adult
Preparation: Pinned
Year Collected: 1889
Locality: Newport news; Va, Virginia, United States
  • Type: Casey. A Review of the American Species of Rutelinae, Dynastinae and Cetoniinae. Memoirs on the Coleoptera VI. 74.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pelidnota punctata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Grapevine beetle

The grapevine beetle, Pelidnota punctata, also known as the spotted June beetle or the spotted pelidnota, is a species of beetle, a member of the subfamily Rutelinae of the Scarab beetle family. Grapevine beetles are common in the north and central United States and Eastern Canada, but do relatively little damage to their host plants. The beetles fly at a fast speed, usually in a curving flight.

The adult beetle is approximately 2.5 centimetres (1 inch) long, but can reach 3 cm (1.2 in) occasionally. Its pattern is off-yellow or auburn red, with three black spots running down each side. Fine black lines divide the edges of its elytra. At other times, the beetle may have been known as Pelidnota lutea. There are two different variations of Pelidnota punctata, the southern variation lacks the darker legs, while the northern variation has darker legs. As Philip Harpootlian points out, the grapevine beetle is a variable species — so much so that T.L. Casey named ten species and subspecies in 1915, names that were later merged back into Pelidnota punctata.[1]

Its color, shape, spots, and behavior sometimes lead it to be misidentified as a giant ladybug. While both are beetles, they are from different families.

Habitat and diet[edit]

The beetle lives in the eastern coast of North America, as well as Florida, Nebraska and north western Missouri, and has been found in central Indiana, South Dakota, Minnesota, southern Wisconsin, southeast Michigan, and southwestern Ontario. Also just found in northwestern Kentucky, Illinois, Maryland, New York, South Western Connecticut, western and eastern Pennsylvania, Northern Michigan, and eastern West Virginia. It lives, like many beetles, in forests, thickets, and woods, and is mostly seen during the summer. Active flyers, these beetles are commonly attracted to lights at night. It is also seen in vineyards and gardens.

The adult beetle eats the leaves and fruit of grapevines, both wild and cultivated, although it is not normally a major pest of vineyards.

Beetle eggs are laid in rotten wood, tree stumps, or on soil near the host plant, where they hatch into larvae. Larvae then dig their way into the soil, where they feed on rotted wood. Pupal chambers are built shallowly underground. The adults emerge in July.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.insectsofwestvirginia.net/b/pelidnota-punctata.html
  2. ^ Milne, Lorus, and Margery Milne. 2000. National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects and Spiders. New York: Knopf. 989 pp. ISBN 0-394-50763-0.
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