Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is present in the rainforests between Ingham and Mossman in north-eastern Queensland, Australia. It is now largely restricted to upland rainforests because of extensive clearing of lowland rainforests. Its area of occupancy has declined substantially in upland areas because of clearing of prime habitat on basalt soils on the Atherton Tableland (Maxwell et al. 1996). The elevational range is sea level to 1,600 m asl.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is found in wet rainforests, and often in secondary forests. Occasionally found in dry and fringing eucalypt forests. They are known to forage in agricultural areas. This species is nocturnal, cryptic, and territorial. Its diet consists of fruit and leaves of a variety of rainforest plants (Maxwell et al. 1996).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Dendrolagus lumholtzi

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Dendrolagus lumholtzi

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Winter, J., Burnett, S. & Martin, R.

Reviewer/s
Lamoreux, J. & Hilton-Taylor, C. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern because, although its extent of occurrence is less than 20,000 km2 and there have been significant historical declines: it is common in suitable habitat, tolerant of some degree of habitat degradation, much of its range is contained within a protected area, there are presently no major threats, no evidence of a current decline in extent or quality of habitat, and the populations are generally thought to be secure.

History
  • 1996
    Lower Risk/near threatened
    (Baillie and Groombridge 1996)
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Population

Population
This species is common in suitable habitat.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
Historically, the main threat has been reduction of habitat, but this has ceased with the declaration of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, and the species appears to have been able to persist in the mosaic of fragmented habitat (particularly where there are available habitat corridors). On the Atherton Tableland, increased fragmentation makes them more vulnerable to predation by dogs, although strategic reforestation on the Atherton Tableland opens the possibility of some recovery of its original area of occupancy in the future (Maxwell et al. 1996). In agricultural areas where it occurs, predation by dogs and road kills represent threats.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is present in the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. The species has been promoted as a flagship species, and it has a very high profile in the region where it occurs. Recommended conservation actions for this species from Maxwell et al. (1996), include: monitor distribution and abundance; study habitat utilisation and population dynamics in fragmented and regenerating rainforest habitats.
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Wikipedia

Lumholtz's tree-kangaroo

Lithograph of Dendrolagus lumholtzi by Joseph Smit, from Proceedings of the general meetings for scientific business of the Zoological Society of London, 1884

Lumholtz's tree-kangaroo (Dendrolagus lumholtzi) is a heavy-bodied tree-kangaroo found in rain forests of the Atherton Tableland Region of Queensland. Its status is classified as least concern[2] by the IUCN, although local authorities classify it as rare.[3] It is named after the Norwegian explorer Carl Sofus Lumholtz (1851–1922).[4]

Description[edit]

It is the smallest of all tree-kangaroos, with males weighing an average of 7.2 kg (16 lbs) and females 5.9 kg (13 lbs).[5] Its head and body length ranges from 480–650 mm, and its tail, 600–740 mm.[6] It has powerful limbs and has short, grizzled grey fur. Its muzzle, toes and tip of tail are black.

Social behaviour[edit]

Lumholtz's tree-kangaroo lives in small, loose-knit groups of three to five, consisting of a male and female mates. Each kangaroo maintains a "home range" and will be hostile towards a member of the same gender that enters it (the one exception seems to be non-hostile encounters between adult males and their male offspring). Thus, the male will protect his own range, and visit the ranges of the females in his group. Mating takes place in episodes of about twenty minutes, and is often quite aggressive.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M, eds. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 60. OCLC 62265494. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. 
  2. ^ a b Winter, J., Burnett, S. & Martin, R. (2008). Dendrolagus lumholtzi. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 12 Oct 2008. Database entry includes justification for why this species is of Least Concern
  3. ^ "Lumholtz's tree-kangaroo". Queensland Government. 2005-08-30. Retrieved 2006-10-09. 
  4. ^ "Carl Sofus Lumholtz - biography". Biography. Australian National Herbarium. 17 December 2009. Retrieved 3 November 2010. "citing: J.W. Cribb, The Queensland Naturalist, Vol.44, Nos.1-3, 2006" 
  5. ^ Flannery, Timothy F, Martin, Roger, Szalay, Alexandria (1996). Tree Kangaroos: A Curious Natural History. Australia: Reed Books. ISBN 0-7301-0492-3. Retrieved 2006-11-25. 
  6. ^ Cronin, Leonard (2000). Australian Mammals: Key Guide (Revised Edition). Annandale, Sydney, Australia: Envirobooks. ISBN 0-85881-172-3. 
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