Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known from the Philippines, Indonesia and northwest Australia (Carpenter and Niem 1998).
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Range Description

This species is known from: Japan (specifically from Niigita on the west coast and Tokyo Bay on the east, Holthuis 1991), south coast of Korea, the South China Sea, Taiwan, east coast of the Philippines (Chan 1997).
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Physical Description

Type Information

Syntype for Scyllarus ciliatus Von Siebold
Catalog Number: USNM 104119
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Invertebrate Zoology
Sex/Stage: female;
Preparation: Dry
Collector(s): P. Von Siebold
Year Collected: 1820
Locality: Japan, North Pacific Ocean
  • Syntype: 1824. Faunae Japonicae. p. 15.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is taken over soft substrates (sand and mud) at a depth range of 150-391 m (Carpenter and Niem 1998).

Systems
  • Marine
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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species can be found on soft substrates, such as sand, mud and clay at a depth range of 49 - 324 m (Holthuis 1991). It prefers salinities of 34 ppt and temperatures between 14oC and 24oC (Chen 1999).

Systems
  • Marine
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Depth range based on 9 specimens in 2 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 3 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 128 - 271
  Temperature range (°C): 13.159 - 15.190
  Nitrate (umol/L): 14.438 - 17.985
  Salinity (PPS): 34.513 - 34.597
  Oxygen (ml/l): 3.333 - 4.057
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.864 - 1.096
  Silicate (umol/l): 22.128 - 27.058

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 128 - 271

Temperature range (°C): 13.159 - 15.190

Nitrate (umol/L): 14.438 - 17.985

Salinity (PPS): 34.513 - 34.597

Oxygen (ml/l): 3.333 - 4.057

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.864 - 1.096

Silicate (umol/l): 22.128 - 27.058
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Dispersal

Depth range

from 49 to 314m, mostly between 100 and 250m
  • Holthuis, L.B. 1991. FAO species catalogue. Vol 13. Marine lobsters of the world. An annotated and illustrated catalogue of species of interest to fisheries known to date. FAO fisheries Synopsis. 125 (13):292 p.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Ibacus ciliatus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Ibacus ciliatus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Butler, M., Cockcroft, A. & MacDiarmid, A.

Reviewer/s
Collen, B., Livingstone, S. & Richman, N.

Contributor/s
Batchelor, A., De Silva, R., Dyer, E., Kasthala, G., Lutz, M.L., McGuinness, S., Milligan, H.T., Soulsby, A.-M. & Whitton, F.

Justification
Ibacus pubescens has been assessed as Data Deficient. This species is frequently confused with I. ciliatus and so it is unclear whether it is a common species, and makes determining harvest levels difficult. Further research is needed on the harvest levels, extent of the fishery and fishing effort before a more accurate assessment of conservation status can be made.
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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Chan, T.Y., Butler, M., Cockcroft, A., MacDiarmid, A., Wahle, R. & Ng Kee Lin, P.

Reviewer/s
Collen, B., Livingstone, S. & Richman, N.

Contributor/s
Batchelor, A., De Silva, R., Dyer, E., Kasthala, G., Lutz, M.L., McGuinness, S., Milligan, H.T., Soulsby, A.-M. & Whitton, F.

Justification
Ibacus ciliatus has been assessed as Data Deficient. While this species is widespread, it is harvested on a commercial scale throughout it's range and is potentially at risk of being taken as by-catch; there is little meaningful data on fishing effort and landings. Further research is needed on the: quantities harvested, other threats, and population before a more accurate assessment of conservation status can be made.
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Population

Population
There is no population information available.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Population

Population
Bürger, around the year 1830, noted that this species could be found on a daily basis in the fish-markets of Nagasaki and nearby areas (in Holthuis and Sakai 1970:112).

The landings of this species and I. novemdentatus reported for Taiwan, are as follows (tonnes):

1989 - 663; 1990 - 310; 1991 - 389; 1992 - 514; 1993 - 456; 1994 - 236; 1995 - 1,224; 1996 - 1,115; 1997 - 642; 1997 - 642; 1998 - 696; 1999 - 676; 2000 - 1,600; 2001 - 1,607; 2002 - 1,005; 2003 - 1,637; 2004 - 1,596; 2005 - 1,553; 2006 - 1,570 (FISHSTAT Plus 2000).

Further species specific information is needed on whether the increases or decreases in the landings reflect changes in fishing effort, or population changes.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
This species is frequently confused with Ibacus ciliatus (Carpenter and Niem 1998). This species is harvested in trawls and is likely to be mixed with I. ciliatus in Philippine markets (Carpenter and Niem 1998). This species is frequently taken as by-catch in the Western Deepwater Trawl Fishery of Australia (Department of the Environment and Heritage 2004). The status of the fishery and the effect of harvesting on the population numbers is unknown.
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Major Threats
This species is caught for human consumption (Holthuis 1991), but it is unknown what effect this is having on the population.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no species-specific conservation measures in place for this species. Further research is needed on the distribution, extent of the fishery, harvest levels, and fishing effort.
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Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no species-specific conservation measures in place for this species. Further research is needed on the levels of harvest.
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Wikipedia

Ibacus ciliatus

Ibacus ciliatus is a species of slipper lobster from the north-west Pacific Ocean.

Description and life cycle[edit]

Ibacus ciliatus is a broad slipper lobster, with a carapace length of up to 80 millimetres (3.1 in),[3] and a total length up to 23 centimetres (9.1 in).[4] It is typically a uniform reddish brown in colour; the tail fan (uropods and telson) can be a browner or a yellower hue.[3] I. ciliatus is very similar to Ibacus pubescens, and can only be distinguished by the lack of pubescence (hairiness) on the carapace, and by the number of teeth along the edges of the carapace; in I. ciliatus there are typically 11 (occasionally 10 or 12), while in I. pubescens there are typically 12 (ranging from 11 to 14).[3]

The larvae of I. ciliatus are the typical phyllosoma larvae found in all slipper lobsters and spiny lobsters. The first phyllosoma is around 3 mm (0.12 in) across, with later stages, sometimes known as "giant phyllosomas", reaching up to 37.5 mm (1.48 in).[3]

Distribution and ecology[edit]

Ibacus ciliatus occurs in the western Pacific Ocean from the Philippines to the Korean Peninsula and southern Japan (south of Niigata on the west coast and Tokyo Bay on the east coast).[1] It is the only species of Ibacus not known to occur around the coast of Australia.[5] Ibacus ciliatus lives on soft substrates at depths of 49–324 metres (161–1,063 ft), at temperatures of 14–24 °C (57–75 °F).[1]

Fishery and conservation[edit]

Records of a fishery for I. ciliatus reach back to 1830, when Heinrich Bürger noted that it was on sale daily in the fish markets around Nagasaki.[1] It is now harvested throughout its range, although there is little data on the quantities being caught.[1] FAO fisheries statistics report captures of around 1,600 tonnes (3,500,000 lb) for most years since 2000, with an increase to 9,114 t (20,093,000 lb) for 2010.[6] Due to the limited knowledge of the species, it has been assessed as Data Deficient on the IUCN Red List.[1]

Taxonomy[edit]

Ibacus ciliatus was first described in 1824 by Philipp Franz von Siebold in De Historiae Naturalis in Japonia statu ("On the Natural History of the State of Japan"), under the name "Scyllarus ciliatus".[2][7] His holotype was deposited at the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie in the Netherlands.[4] It was transferred to the genus Ibacus in 1841 by Wilhem de Haan.[3] A former subspecies of I. ciliatus, "I. ciliatus pubescens", is now accorded the rank of full species, as Ibacus pubescens.[1]

The official Japanese name for the species is utiwaebi (ウチワエビ?), meaning "fan lobster".[3] In Thailand, it is known as kung kradan deng, while in the Philippines, the names pitik-pitik (Hiligaynon and Cebuano) and cupapa (Surigaonon) are used.[3] The English vernacular name preferred by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is "Japanese fan lobster".[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g M. Butler, T. Y. Chan, A. Cockcroft, A. MacDiarmid, P. Ng Kee Lin & R. Wahle (2011). "Ibacus ciliatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.1. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved June 21, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Tin-Yam Chan (2010). "Ibacus ciliatus (von Siebold, 1824)". World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved June 21, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Lipke Holthuis (1985). "A revision of the family Scyllaridae (Crustacea: Decapoda: Macrura). I. Subfamily Ibacinae" (PDF). Zoologische Verhandelingen 218: 1–130. 
  4. ^ a b c Lipke Holthuis (1991). "Ibacus Leach, 1815" (PDF). Marine Lobster of the World. FAO Fisheries Synopsis No. 125. Rome, Italy: Food and Agriculture Organization. pp. 203–204. ISBN 978-92-5-103027-1. 
  5. ^ D. E. Brown & L. B. Holthuis (1998). "The Australian species of the genus Ibacus (Crustacea: Decapoda: Scyllaridae), with the description of a new species and addition of new records" (PDF). Zoologische Mededelingen 72 (10): 113–141. 
  6. ^ "Global Capture Production 1950–2010". FIGIS. Food and Agriculture Organization. Retrieved June 21, 2012. 
  7. ^ Philipp Franz von Siebold (1824). De Historiae Naturalis in Japonia statu. Batavia (Jakarta). p. 16. 
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