Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to Australia, where it is distributed in the tropical monsoonal part of Northern Territory (Watson and Calaby 2008). It is present in Kakadu National Park and Litchfield National Park.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is found in areas of woodland and open forest, dominated by eucalypts, with a grassy or shrubby understorey (Watson and Calaby 2008). The females may give birth to 10 young (Watson and Calaby 2008).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 3.4 years (captivity) Observations: One specimen was still alive after 3.4 years in captivity (Richard Weigl 2005).
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Woinarski, J. & Oakwood, M.

Reviewer/s
Lamoreux, J. & Hilton-Taylor, C. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern because, although a possible major threat from cane toads could exist, it has a wide distribution, presumed large population, occurs in protected areas, and it is unlikely to be declining at nearly the rate required to qualify for listing in a threatened category.

History
  • 1996
    Lower Risk/least concern
    (Baillie and Groombridge 1996)
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Population

Population
The population size of this species fluctuates. The species is patchily distributed, even in appropriate habitat.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
Cane toads may be a threat (research underway). The spread of exotic grasses and changes in fire regime may be threats (affecting foraging success).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The species is present in several protected areas (e.g., Kakadu National Park and Litchfield National Park). Further studies are needed into possible threats (response to fire and toads) to the species. Monitoring is needed, along with increased management of the area.
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Wikipedia

Fawn Antechinus

The fawn antechinus (Antechinus bellus) is a species of small carnivorous marsupial found in northern Australia. It is the only Antechinus to be found in the Northern Territory and has a patchy, restricted range.

Contents

Taxonomy

The earliest collection of a fawn antechinus was made by John T. Tunney,[3] and first described in 1904 by the renowned biologist Oldfield Thomas, who gave it the species name bellus, meaning beautiful.[4] It has never been confused with other species.

It is a member of the family Dasyuridae and of the genus Antechinus (meaning "hedgehog-equivalent"), which has nine other members.

Description

The fawn antechinus is unique among antechinuses, being considerably paler than many of its relatives. It is a light grey colour and is distinguished from the only other similar species in the area where it lives (the sandstone dibbler and the red-cheeked dunnart) by its larger size and paler colouring. It is insectivorous and, like many of its relatives, all of the males die after the breeding season .[5]

The fawn antechinus has a breeding season during August. Young are born in September-October in litters of up to ten, and are usually weaned by January.[5]

Distribution and habitat

The fawn antechinus is found in the Top End of the Northern Territory, where it is fairly common.[4] It inhabits tall, fairly open forest in the tropics.

References

  1. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). In Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 29. OCLC 62265494. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. 
  2. ^ Woinarski, J. & Oakwood, M. (2008). Antechinus bellus. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 9 October 2008.
  3. ^ Kristofer M. Helgen, Roberto Portela Miguez, James Kohen and Lauren Helgen (2012). "Twentieth century occurrence of the Long-Beaked Echidna Zaglossus bruijnii in the Kimberley region of Australia". ZooKeys 255: 103–132. doi:10.3897/zookeys.255.3774. 
  4. ^ a b Calaby, J.H. (1995). "Fawn Antechinus". In Strahan, Ronald. The Mammals of Australia. Reed Books. pp. 85–86 
  5. ^ a b Menkhorst, Peter (2001). A Field Guide to the Mammals of Australia. Oxford University Press. p. 54. 
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