Overview

Distribution

Range Description

The Appenine shrew is endemic to the Italian peninsula. It is recorded from the Appenines to Calabria, at altitudes between 300 m and 1,160 m, but its exact distribution is poorly known (Hausser 1990, 1999, Amori and Aloise 2005).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
A poorly known species. It occurs in shrubland habitat within forested areas (G. Amori pers. comm. 2006), but avoids densely forested areas (Mortelliti et al. 2007). Hausser (1990) describes it as being found near streams, in bogs, and in hedgerows and stone walls in damp areas.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Amori, G.

Reviewer/s
Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority) & Temple, H. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has a relatively large range, within which it is widespread. Population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population size criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. less than 10,000 mature individuals in conjunction with appropriate decline rates and subpopulation qualifiers). Population trend has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the threshold for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations), as no major threats to the species are known. For these reasons, it is evaluated as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
It is not abundant, but it is quite widespread (G. Amori pers. comm. 2006). There are no data on population trend.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Pesticides and habitat destruction (through agriculture and urbanisation) are considered to be the main threats (G. Amori pers. comm. 2006).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It is listed on Appendix III of the Bern Convention. It occurs in protected areas in parts of the range. Research is required on its distribution, population status, and trends.
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Wikipedia

Apennine shrew

The Apennine shrew (Sorex samniticus) is a species of shrew in the Soricidae family. The mammal is endemic to Italy.

References[edit]

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