The following bibliography has been generated by bringing together all references provided by our content partners. There may be duplication.

References

  • 1. Anderson, D. A.; Balthis, R. F. 1944. Effect of annual fall fires on the taper of longleaf pine. Journal of Forestry. 42(7): 518. [12010]
  • 10. Brown, Arthur A.; Davis, Kenneth P. 1973. Forest fire control and use. 2nd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill. 686 p. [15993]
  • 11. Bruce, David. 1947. Thirty-two years of annual burning in longleaf pine. Journal of Forestry. 45(11): 809-814. [11001]
  • 12. Bruce, David. 1951. Fire, site, and longleaf height growth. Journal of Forestry. 49(1): 25-28. [12011]
  • 13. Bruce, David; Bickford, C. Allen. 1950. Use of fire in natural regeneration of longleaf pine. Journal of Forestry. 48(2): 114-117. [11862]
  • 14. Byram, G. M.; Nelson, R. M. 1952. Lethal temperatures and fire injury. Res. Note No. 1. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station. 2 p. [16317]
  • 16. Conner, Richard N.; Rudolph, D. Craig; Kulhavy, David L.; Snow, Ann E. 1991. Causes of mortality of red-cockaded woodpecker cavity trees. Journal of Wildlife Management. 55(3): 531-537. [16319]
  • 17. Crocker, Thomas C., Jr. 1990. Longleaf pine - myths and facts. In: Proceedings of the symposium on the management of longleaf pine; 1989 April 4-6; Long Beach, MS. Gen. Tech. Rep. SO-75. New Orleans, LA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station: 2-10. [14983]
  • 18. Croker, Thomas C., Jr.; Boyer, William D. 1975. Regenerating longleaf pine naturally. Res. Pap. SO-105. New Orleans, LA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station. 21 p. [12016]
  • 19. Eyre, F. H., ed. 1980. Forest cover types of the United States and Canada. Washington, DC: Society of American Foresters. 148 p. [905]
  • 2. Baker, James B. [n.d.]. Alternative silvicultural systems -- south. In: Silvicultural challenges and opportunities in the 1990's: Proceedings of the National Silvicultural Workshop; 1989 July 10-13; Petersburg, AK. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Timber Management: 51-60. [15024]
  • 20. Garren, Kenneth H. 1943. Effects of fire on vegetation of the southeastern United States. Botanical Review. 9: 617-654. [9517]
  • 21. Garrison, George A.; Bjugstad, Ardell J.; Duncan, Don A.; [and others]
  • 23. Grelen, Harold E. 1983. May burning favors survival and early height growth of longleaf pine seedlings. Southern Journal of Applied Forestry. 7(1): 16-20. [15866]
  • 24. Hartnett, David C.; Krofta, Douglas M. 1989. Fifty-five years of post-fire succession in a southern mixed hardwood forest. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club. 116(2): 107-113. [9153]
  • 25. Kitchens, Robert N. 1989. Alternative silvicultural systems on southern National Forests: a status report. In: Silvicultural challenges and opportunities in the 1990's: Proceedings of the National Silvicultural Workshop; 1989 July 10-13; Petersburg, AK. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Timber Management: 46-50. [15023]
  • 26. Kraus, John F.; Sluder, Earl R. 1990. Genecology of longleaf pine in Georgia and Florida. Res. Pap. SE-278. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station. 31 p. [14601]
  • 27. Kuchler, A. W. 1964. Manual to accompany the map of potential vegetation of the conterminous United States. Special Publication No. 36. New York: American Geographical Society. 77 p. [1384]
  • 28. Landers, J. Larry. 1991. Disturbance influences on pine traits in the southeastern United States. In: Proceedings, 17th Tall Timbers fire ecology conference; 1989 May 18-21; Tallahassee, FL. Tallahassee, FL: Tall Timbers Research Station: 61-95. [17601]
  • 29. Langdon, O. Gordon. 1971. Effects of prescribed burning on timber species in the Southeastern Coastal Plain. In: Prescribed burning symposium: Proceedings; 1971 April 14-16; Charleston, SC. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station: 34-44. [10420]
  • 3. Boyer, William D. 1974. Impact of prescribed fires on mortality of released and unreleased longleaf pine seedlings. Res. Note SO-182. New Orleans, LA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station. 6 p. [11937]
  • 30. Lipscomb, Donald J. 1989. Impacts of feral hogs on longleaf pine regeneration. Southern Journal of Applied Forestry. 13(4): 177-181. [12029]
  • 31. Little, Elbert L., Jr. 1979. Checklist of United States trees (native and naturalized). Agric. Handb. 541. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. 375 p. [2952]
  • 33. Maple, William R. 1970. Prescribed winter fire thins dense longleaf seedling stand. Res. Note SO-104. New Orleans, LA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station. 2 p. [11860]
  • 35. Maple, William R. 1976. How to estimate longleaf seedling mortality before control burns. Journal of Forestry. 74(8): 517-518. [11950]
  • 36. McCune, Bruce. 1988. Ecological diversity in North American pines. American Journal of Botany. 75(3): 353-368. [5651]
  • 37. Means, D. Bruce; GROW, G. 1985. The endangered longleaf pine community. ENFO. 85(4): 1-12. [15894]
  • 38. Myers, Ronald L. 1990. Scrub and high pine. In: Myers, Ronald L.; Ewel, John J., eds. Ecosystems of Florida. Orlando, FL: University of Central Florida Press: 150-193. [17389]
  • 4. Boyer, William D. 1975. Brown-spot infection on released and unreleased longleaf pine seedlings. Res. Pap. SO-108. New Orleans, LA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station. 9 p. [11865]
  • 40. Noss, Reed F. 1988. The longleaf pine landscape of the Southeast: almost gone and almost forgotten. Endangered Species UPDATE. 5(5): 1-5. [17077]
  • 41. Noss, Reed F. 1989. Longleaf pine and wiregrass: keystone components of an endangered Ecosystem. Natural Areas Journal. 9(4): 211-213. [12033]
  • 43. Platt, William J.; Evans, Gregory W.; Rathbun, Stephen L. 1988. The population dynamics of a long-lived conifer (Pinus palustris). American Naturalist. 131(4): 491-525. [12032]
  • 44. Platt, William J.; Glitzenstein, Jeff S.; Streng, Donna R. 1991. Evaluating pyrogenicity and its effects on vegetation in longleaf pine savannas. In: Proceedings, 17th Tall Timbers fire ecology conference; 1989 May 18-21; Tallahassee, FL. Tallahassee, FL: Tall Timbers Research Station: 143-161. [17606]
  • 45. Rounsaville, Marc G. 1989. Woodpeckers, recreationists and lumbermen cheer the success of artificial regeneration of longleaf pine. In: Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop: Silviculture for all resources; 1987 May 11-14; Sacramento, CA. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Timber Management: 104-114. [10210]
  • 46. Raunkiaer, C. 1934. The life forms of plants and statistical plant geography. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 632 p. [2843]
  • 47. Short, Henry L.; Epps, E. A., Jr. 1976. Nutrient quality and digestibility of seeds and fruits from southern forests. Journal of Wildlife Management. 40(2): 283-289. [10510]
  • 48. Tracey, W. David; Kulhavy, David L.; Ross, William G. 1991. Land and resource management on typic quartzipsamments. In: Coleman, Sandra S.; Neary, Daniel G., compilers. Proceedings, 6th biennial southern silvicultural research conference: Volume 1; 1990 October 30 - November 1; Memphis, TN. Gen. Tech. Rep. SE-70. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station: 475-484. [17494]
  • 5. Boyer, William D. 1979. The shelterwood system. In: Proceedings of the National silviculture workshop. Theme: The shelterwood regeneration method; 1979 September 17-21; Charleston, SC. Washington, D. C.: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Division of Timber Management: 124-128. [11664]
  • 50. Vogel, Willis G. 1981. A guide for revegetating coal minespoils in the eastern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-68. Broomall, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 190 p. [15577]
  • 53. Workman, Sarah W.; McLeod, Kenneth W. 1991. Fire suppression, hardwood composition, and seasonal burns in longleaf pine sandhills. In: Proceedings, 17th Tall Timbers fire ecology conference; 1989 May 18-21; Tallahassee, FL. Tallahassee, FL: Tall Timbers Research Station: 423. Abstract. [17632]
  • 54. Wright, Henry A.; Bailey, Arthur W. 1982. Fire ecology: United States and southern Canada. New York: John Wiley & Sons. 501 p. [2620]
  • 56. Stickney, Peter F. 1989. FEIS postfire regeneration workshop--April 12: Seral origin of species comprising secondary plant succession in Northern Rocky Mountain forests. 10 p. Unpublished draft on file at: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory, Missoula, MT. [50817]
  • 6. Boyer, William D. 1987. Volume growth loss: a hidden cost of periodic prescribed burning in longleaf pine?. Southern Journal of Applied Forestry. 11(3): 154-157. [11861]
  • 7. Boyer, W. D. 1990. Pinus palustris Mill. longleaf pine. In: Burns, Russell M.; Honkala, Barbara H., technical coordinators. Silvics of North America. Volume 1. Conifers. Agric. Handb. 654. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 405-412. [13398]
  • 8. Boyer, William D. 1990. Growing-season burns for control of hardwoods in longleaf pine stands. Res. Pap. SO-256. New Orleans, LA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station. 7 p. [14604]
  • 9. Bridges, Edwin L.; Orzell, Steve L. 1989. Longleaf pine communities of the west Gulf Coastal Plain. Natural Areas Journal. 9(4): 246-263. [10091]
  • Burns, Russell M., and Barbara H. Honkala, technical coordinators. 1990. Silvics of North America: 1. Conifers; 2. Hardwoods.   Agriculture Handbook 654 (Supersedes Agriculture Handbook 271,Silvics of Forest Trees of the United States, 1965).   U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, DC. vol.2, 877 pp.   http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm External link.
  • Farjon A. (2013). Conifer Database (version Jul 2011). In: Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life, 11th March 2013 (Roskov Y., Kunze T., Paglinawan L., Orrell T., Nicolson D., Culham A., Bailly N., Kirk P., Bourgoin T., Baillargeon G., Hernandez F., De Wever A., eds). Digital resource at www.catalogueoflife.org/col/. Species 2000: Reading, UK.
  • Gresham, C. A.; Williams, T. M.; Lipscomb, D. J. 1991. Hurricane Hugo Wind Damage to Southeastern US Coastal Forest Tree Species. Biotropica. 23(4): 420-426.
  • Grimshaw, J. & Bayton, R. 2009. New trees (recent introductions to cultivation). Kew Publishing, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
  • Image metadata at Bioimages (http://bioimages.vanderbilt.edu/)   http://bioimages.vanderbilt.edu/baskauf/00000 External link.
  • Marticorena C & R Rodríguez . 1995-2005. Flora de Chile. Vols 1, 2(1-3). Ed. Universidad de Concepción, Concepción. 351 pp., 99 pp., 93 pp., 128 pp. Matthei O. 1995. Manual de las malezas que crecen en Chile. Alfabeta Impresores. 545 p.
  • Mill. 1768. In: Gard. Dict., ed. 8: Pinus No. 14.
  • Small, J. K. 1933. Man. S.E. Fl. i–xxii, 1–1554. Published by the Author, New York.
  • Steven Vogel. 2003. Comparative Biomechanics: Life's Physical World. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 580 p.
  • The Gardeners Dictionary: . . . eighth edition no. 14. 1768. (Gard. Dict. (ed. 8))
  •    
       
    1. Boyer, William D. 1972. Brown-spot resistance in natural stands of  longleaf pine seedlings. USDA Forest Service, Research Note SO-142.  Southern Forest Experiment Station, New Orleans, LA. 4 p.
    2.  
    3. Boyer, William D. 1974. Longleaf pine cone production related to  pollen density. In Seed yield from southern pine seed orchards.  John Krause, ed. Proceedings, Colloquium, April 2-3, 1974, Macon,  Georgia. p. 8-14. Georgia Forest Research Council, Macon.
    4.  
    5. Boyer, William D. 1979. Regenerating the natural longleaf pine  forest. Journal of Forestry 77:572-575.
    6.  
    7. Boyer, William D. 1979. Mortality among seed trees in longleaf  shelterwood stands. Southern Journal of Applied Forestry 3:165-167. 
    8.  
    9. Boyer, William D. 1981. Pollen production and dispersal as affected  by seasonal temperature and rainfall patterns. In Pollen  Management Handbook. p. 2-9. E. Carlyle Franklin, ed. U.S. Department of  Agriculture, Agriculture Handbook 587. Washington, DC.
    10.  
    11. Boyer, William D. 1983. Variations in height-over-age curves for  young longleaf pine plantations. Forest Science 29:15-27.
    12.  
    13. Boyer, William D. 1987. Annual and geographic variations in cone  production by longleaf pine. In Proceedings of the Fourth  Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference. p. 73-76. USDA  Forest Service, General Technical Report SE-42. Southeastern Forest  Experiment Station, Ashville, NC.
    14.  
    15. Buol, S. W., ed. 1973. Soils of the southern States and Puerto Rico.  Southern Cooperative Bulletin 174, Joint Regional Publication.  Agriculture Experiment Stations of Southern States and Puerto Rico, with  cooperative assistance by U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil  Conservation Service. Washington, DC. 105 p.
    16.  
    17. Croker, T. C. 1952. Early release stimulates cone production. USDA  Forest Service, Southern Forestry Notes 79. Southern Forest Experiment  Station, New Orleans, LA. 3 p.
    18.  
    19. Croker, Thomas C., Jr. 1973. Longleaf pine cone production in  relation to site index, stand age, and stand density. USDA Forest  Service, Research Note SO-156. Southern Forest Experiment Station, New  Orleans, LA. 3 p.
    20.  
    21. Croker, Thomas C., Jr., and William D. Boyer. 1975. Regenerating  longleaf pine naturally. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper SO-105.  Southern Forest Experiment Station, New Orleans, LA_ 21 p.
    22.  
    23. Eyre, F. H., ed. 1980. Forest cover types of the United States and  Canada. Society of American Foresters, Washington, DC. 148 p.
    24.  
    25. Farrar, Robert M., Jr. 1968. Thinning longleaf pine on average sites.  Journal of Forestry 66:906-909.
    26.  
    27. Farrar, Robert M., Jr. 1975. Sprouting ability of longleaf pine.  Forest Science 21:189-190.
    28.  
    29. Farrar, Robert M., Jr. 1985. Volume and growth predictions for  thinned even-aged natural longleaf pine stands in the East Gulf area.  USDA Forest Service, Research Paper SO-220. Southern Forest Experiment  Station, New Orleans, LA. 171 p.
    30.  
    31. Fowells, H. A., comp. 1965. Silvics of forest trees of the United  States. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Handbook 271.  Washington, DC. 762 p.
    32.  
    33. Grelen, Harold E., and Hans G. Enghardt. 1973. Burning and thinning  maintain forage in a longleaf pine plantation. Journal of Forestry  71:419-425.
    34.  
    35. Hare, Robert C. 1987. Increase longleaf pine seed yields by  inhibiting conelet abortion. Southern Journal of Applied Forestry  11:6-9.
    36.  
    37. Hebb, E. A. 1972. Resistance to ice damage-a consideration in  reforestation. Tree Planters' Notes 22(2):24-25.
    38.  
    39. Hepting, George H. 1971. Diseases of forest and shade trees of the  United States. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Handbook 386.  Washington, DC. 658 p.
    40.  
    41. Hodgkins, Earl J., ed. 1965. Southeastern forest habitat regions  based on physiography. Auburn University, Forestry Departmental Series  2. Agricultural Experiment Station, Auburn, AL. 10 p.
    42.  
    43. Lohrey, Richard E., and Robert L. Bailey. 1977. Yield tables and  stand structure for unthinned longleaf pine plantations in Louisiana and  Texas. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper SO-133. Southern Forest  Experiment Station, New Orleans, LA. 53 p.
    44.  
    45. Lynch, Keith D. 1980. A phenotypic study of selected variables in  longleaf pine. Thesis (Ph.D.), Unpublished report. Auburn University,  Auburn, AL.
    46.  
    47. McLemore, B.F. 1977. Strobili and conelet losses in four species of  southern pines. USDA Forest Service, Research Note SO-226. Southern  Forest Experiment Station, New Orleans, IA. 5 p.
    48.  
    49. Michael, J. L. 1980. Long-term impact of aerial application of  2,4,5-T to longleaf pine (Pinus palustris). Weed Science  28:255-257.
    50.  
    51. Schopmeyer, C. S., tech. coord. 1974. Seeds of woody plants in the  United States. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Handbook 450.  Washington, DC. 883 p.
    52.  
    53. Shoulders, Eugene. 1967. Fertilizer application, inherent  fruitfulness, and rainfall affect flowering of longleaf pine. Forest  Science 13:376-383.
    54.  
    55. Snyder, E. Bayne, Ronald J. Dinus, and Harold J. Derr. 1977. Genetics  of longleaf pine. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper WO-33. Washington,  DC. 24 p.
    56.  
    57. Wahlenberg, W. G. 1946. Longleaf pine: its use, ecology,  regeneration, protection, growth, and management. Charles Lathrop Pack  Forestry Foundation and USDA Forest Service, Washington, DC. 429 p. 
    58.  
    59. White, Timothy L., H. G. Harris, Jr. and R. C. Kellison. 1977.  Conelet abortion in longleaf pine. Canadian Journal of Forest Research  7:378-382.
    60.  
    61. Wolters, Gale L. 1973. Southern pine overstories influence herbage  quality. Journal of Range Management 26:423-426.
    62.  
     

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