Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology of the Bee Mite Species Pyemotes tritici

P. tritici, may produce severe skin lesions, asthma, or nausea in humans. It has also been shown to have great potential as a biological control agent for insect pests (Kethley, 1982). Its effectiveness as a parasitoid results from several characteristics (Bruce, 1989):

(1) high reproductive potential;
(2) short life-cycle (4-7 days);
(3) no intermediate hosts or food sources required-- all development occurs within the opisthosomal sac of the adult female and all offspring are born live as sexually mature adults;
(4) only females are parasitic and represent about 90-95% of the population;
(5) females mate immediately at birth and begin host-seeking activity;
(6) populations are easily reared and synchronized in the laboratory; and (7) they are cosmopolitan in distribution.
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Bee-Associated Mite Web

Source: Bee-Associated Mites of the World

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Distribution

Distribution of the Bee Mite Species Pyemotes tritici

Cosmopolitan (Moser et al. 1987), including USA: Hawaii, Georgia, Louisiana, Kansas; Mexico: Sonora; Cuba (Cross & Moser, 1975); Brazil (Menezes at al., 2009); France (type locality), Iran (Kamali et al. 2001).
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Ecology

Associations

Host Associations of the Bee Mite Species Pyemotes tritici

Insects of various orders. In Brazil, the following managed stingless bee species were attacked (Menezes at al., 2009):; ; Tetragonisca angustula (Latreille, 1811); Frieseomelitta varia (Lepeletier, 1836); Melipona subnitida Ducke, 1911; Melipona asilvai Moure, 1971.; ; Eickwort (1988) suggested that records of P. venticosus attacking honeybees may refer to Pyemotes tritici, see Notes for Pyemotes venticosus.
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Conservation

Management

Management of the Bee Mite Species Pyemotes tritici

Pyemotes tritici, was reported to kill four colonies of stingless bees Tetragonisca an­gustula and one colony of Frieseomelitta varia in Brazil. The infestation was terminated by isolating the dead colonies from the meliponary (Menezes at al., 2009).
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Wikipedia

Pyemotes tritici

Pyemotes tritici is a species of mite known as the grain itch mite or straw itch mite. There is some evidence that it may be associated with dermatitis in humans.[2]

References

  1. ^ "Species Pyemotes tritici (LaGrèze-Fossat & Montagné, 1851)". Australian Faunal Directory. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Retrieved May 14, 2010. 
  2. ^ S. Rosen, I. Yeruham & Y. Braverman (2002). "Dermatitis in humans associated with the mites Pyemotes tritici, Dermanyssus gallinae, Ornithonyssus bacoti and Androlaelaps casalis in Israel". Medical and Veterinary Entomology 16 (4): 442–444. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2915.2002.00386.x. PMID 12510897. 


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