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Overview

Brief Summary

New York State Invasive Species Information

The Asian shore crab, a native of the western Pacific Ocean from Russia to Hong Kong and the Japanese archipelago, is also known as Japanese shore crab and Pacific crab. Its known New York range includes the Hudson River and its lower tributaries and Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge on the north shore of Long Island. The crab’s means of introduction to the U.S. Atlantic coast is unknown, but it is theorized that adults or larvae were introduced via ballast water discharge from international shipping.

Identification:

This shore crab has a square-shaped shell with 3 spines on each side of the carapace. Males have a fleshy, bulb-like structure at the base of the moveable claw finger. Carapace colors can be green, red, orangish brown or purple. Claws have red spots; legs are light and dark banded. Adult carapace width ranges from 1.4 inches to 1.7 inches. This species is highly reproductive, breeding from May to September, with females capable of producing three to four clutches per season, each containing up to 50,000 eggs. Free-floating larvae can be transported over long distances during the month that it takes them to develop into juveniles and settle out of the water column.

Impacts: Owing to this crab being an opportunistic omnivore (it feeds on macroalgae, salt marsh grass, larval and juvenile fish, and small invertebrates), it could potentially negatively impact populations of such native species as fish, shellfish and other crabs by predation and by general food web effects. It could also out-compete native mud crabs, blue crabs and lobsters.

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© The New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse, Cornell University Cooperative Extension

Supplier: Tracy Barbaro

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The East Asian shore crab originated in the western part of the Pacific Ocean, near Japan, China and Korea. It has since made a world journey: In 1988, it was first found along the eastern coast of the USA (New Jersey). In the meantime, it has spread there over more than 900 kilometers of coast. In 1999, eleven years later, it surfaced for the first time in Europe, on the French coast by Le Havre. Large numbers were reported in 2004 on the dike on Texel. The crab has sturdy claws and legs. Males have a blister in their claw, making them easy to identify. This also explains the Dutch name 'blister crab'. Although they are smaller than the shore crab, they are very quick and have a mean pinch.
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© Copyright Ecomare

Source: Ecomare

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Distribution

Exotic species found from North Carolina to Isle au Haut, Maine.
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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© NatureServe

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 2 specimens in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): -1.5 - -1.3

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): -1.5 - -1.3
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Migration

Alien species

De blaasjeskrab Hemigrapsus sanguineus kwam oorspronkelijk enkel voor in de noordwest Pacifische regio, maar werd via schepen - in ballastwater of op de romp - naar Europa gebracht. De soort werd voor het eerst in Europa waargenomen in 1999 in Frankrijk en Nederland. In 2006 is ze ook in België waargenomen in Knokke-Heist en Nieuwpoort. De blaasjeskrab Hemigrapsus sanguineus en de verwante penseelkrab Hemigrapsus takanoi zijn heel talrijk aanwezig langs onze kust, zowel in het intergetijdengebied als dieper in zee. Er bestaat geen twijfel dat deze exoten onze plaatselijke systemen beïnvloeden, hoewel er nog geen sluitende studies zijn. Het zijn beiden predatoren van allerlei ongewervelden en ze treden in competitie met de inheemse krabbenfauna.
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Alien species

The asian shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus originates from the Northwest Pacific region, but was brought to Europe by ships (either in ballast water or attached to the hull). The first European observations were made in 1999 in France and Holland. In 2006 the crab was also reported in Belgium in the regions Knokke-Heist and Nieuwpoort. The asian shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus and its relative the hairy clawed shore crab Hemigrapsus takanoi are numerous along the Belgian coast, both in the inter-tidal zone and deeper into the sea. Eventhough there is a lack of conclusive studies, there is no doubt that these alien species have an influence on European systems. Both are predators of many invertebrates and compete with native crab fauna.
  • VLIZ Alien Species Consortium
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Hemigrapsus sanguineus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 24 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

GTAGGTACATCACTA---AGATTAATTATTCGAGCAGAATTAAGACAACCAGGAAGCTTAATTGGTAAT---GATCAAATCTATAATGTAGTTGTTACAGCTCATGCTTTCGTAATAATTTTCTTTATAGTTATGCCAATTATAATTGGAGGATTTGGGAACTGATTAGTACCGCTTATA---CTCGGAGCCCCAGATATAGCCTTTCCCCGTATAAATAATATAAGATTTTGACTTCTTCCTCCTTCCCTATCCCTCCTTTTAACAAGAAGAATAGTAGAAAGAGGTGTAGGCACCGGATGAACCGTTTATCCGCCACTTGCAGCTGCTATTGCCCACGCTGGAGCCTCTGTAGATCTTGGA---ATTTTTTCTCTACATCTTGCGGGGGTATCCTCCATTTTAGGGGCTGTTAATTTTATAACAACCGTTATCAATATACGCTCCTATGGTATAACAATAGATCAAATACCACTCTTCGTATGAGCTGTATTTATTACTGCCATCCTCTTGCTTTTATCTTTACCAGTCTTGGCAGGA---GCTATCACTATGCTACTCACAGATCGTAATTTAAATACATCATTCTTCGATCCTGCAGGGGGAGGTGACCCGGTACT
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hemigrapsus sanguineus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 23
Specimens with Barcodes: 33
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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