Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:23
Specimens with Sequences:33
Specimens with Barcodes:22
Species:8
Species With Barcodes:8
Public Records:21
Public Species:8
Public BINs:1
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Wikipedia

Lubomirskiidae

Lubomirskiidae is a family of freshwater sponges from Lake Baikal in Russia.[1]

Lubomirskia baicalensis, Baikalospongia bacillifera and B. intermedia are unusually large for freshwater sponges and can reach 1 m (3.3 ft) or more.[2][3] These three are also the most common sponges in Lake Baikal.[2] Most sponges in the lake are typically green when alive because of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zoochlorella), but can also be brownish or yellowish.[4]

Genera and species[edit]

The family contains four genera and twelve species:[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Paradina; Kulikova; Suturin; and Saibatalova (2003). The Distribution of Chemical Elements in Sponges of the Family Lubomirskiidae in Lake Baikal. International Symposium - Speciation in Ancient Lakes, SIAL III - Irkutsk 2002. Berliner Paläobiologische Abhandlungen 4: 151-157.
  2. ^ a b Kaluzhnaya; Belikov; Schröder; Rothenberger; Zapf; Kaandorp; Borejko; Müller; and Müller (2005). Dynamics of skeleton formation in the Lake Baikal sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis. Part I. Biological and biochemical studies. Naturwissenschaften 92: 128–133.
  3. ^ Belikov; Kaluzhnaya; Schröder; Müller; and Müller (2007). Lake Baikal endemic sponge Lubomirskia baikalensis: structure and organization of the gene family of silicatein and its role in morphogenesis. Porifera Research: Biodiversity, Innovation and Sustainability, pp. 179-188.
  4. ^ Müller; and Grachev, eds. (2009). Biosilica in Evolution, Morphogenesis, and Nanobiotechnology: Case Study Lake Baikal, pp. 81-110. Springer Publishing. ISBN 978-3-540-88551-1.
  5. ^ http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=167011


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