Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known from central coastal French Guiana. It has been recorded from 5-200m asl.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Type Information

Paratype for Atelopus franciscus
Catalog Number: USNM 192814
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Sex/Stage: Male;
Preparation: Ethanol
Year Collected: 1971
Locality: Crique Gregoire (station 1), Kerenrok, area of Sinnamary River, Inini, Cayenne, French Guiana, South America
  • Paratype: Lescure, J. 1974. Vie et Milieu. 23 (1): 131, figures 2 and 3A.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found near fast-flowing small streams and creeks in lowland rainforest; it is not known from any disturbed habitats. Eggs are laid in the water and the tadpoles adhere to rocks.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Atelopus franciscus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
A3ce

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Jean Lescure, Christian Marty, Marga Born, Renaud Boistel, Robert Reynolds, Marinus Hoogmoed, Ross MacCulloch, Philippe Gaucher, Stefan Lötters

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson, Neil Cox and Bruce Young)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Vulnerable because of a projected population decline, estimated to be more than 30% over the next ten years, inferred from declines in other Atelopus species in the same region, probably due to chytridiomycosis.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
It is a locally common species (Lescure and Marty 2001), and was recorded as recently as 2000.

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
There are no current major threats. However, it is potentially at risk from chytridiomycosis, although it occurs at low altitudes (which might afford it a degree of protection from this disease). An illegal international pet trade exists for this species, but it is not a threat to the species as a whole.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The range of the species includes several nature reserves. Continued population monitoring is required, especially in light of the potential threat of chytridiomycosis.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Atelopus franciscus

Atelopus franciscus is a species of toad in the Bufonidae family, endemic to the central coastal region of French Guiana; it is sometimes known as the central coast stubfoot toad.[2] It is a locally common, diurnal species found near fast-flowing small streams and creeks in lowland rainforest.[1][3] Many authors have suggested that this taxon might be a synonym of Atelopus flavescens.[2]

Reproduction and behaviour[edit]

Male with internal vocal sack
Male territorial call

To attract females and to defend their territories, male Atelopus franciscus use advertisement calls, not visual displays as typical for Atelopus. This is somewhat unexpected, given that their environment is noisy and that males have to acoustically compete with males of several other frog species (e.g., Allobates femoralis and Otophryne pyburni). Moreover, this species lacks an external vocal sack, and so can only produce low intensity calls that propagate short distances (<8 m). It also lacks an external tympanum and could be considered anatomically deaf. Nevertheless, it has a well developed inner ear and has been shown to respond acoustically to the calls of conspecifics in the field.[3]

Male territories are closely spaced, only 2–4 meters apart on average, and despite the handicaps discussed above, acoustic communication appears sufficiently efficient at these short distances.[3]

Eggs are laid in the water. The tadpoles adhere to rocks.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Lescure, J., Marty, C., Born, M., Boistel, R., Reynolds, R., Hoogmoed, M., MacCulloch, R., Gaucher, P. & Lötters, S. (2004). "Atelopus franciscus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 9 September 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Frost, Darrel R. (2014). "Atelopus franciscus Lescure, 1974". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 9 September 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c Boistel, R.; Aubin, T.; Cloetens, P.; Langer, M.; Gillet, B.; Josset, P.; Pollet, N.; Herrel, A. (2011). "Whispering to the deaf: communication by a frog without external vocal sac or tympanum in noisy environments". PLoS ONE 6 (7): e22080. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0022080. PMC 3135622. PMID 21779377.  edit
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!