Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This Australian endemic occurs along the coast of Queensland and northern New South Wales. The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 320,500km2. This species is commonly relocated in the transportation of fresh produce.
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Distribution and Habitat

Occurs along the coast of Queensland and northern New South Wales.The extent of occurrence of the species is approximately 320500 km2

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species is found in moist forest or woodland habitats. It is also common in disturbed habitats such as fruit plantations. During winter it shelters in the crowns of trees well away from water. Breeds in spring and summer, usually in ephemeral waters. Eggs are attached to stems of grass in ponds. Tadpoles take about 14 weeks to mature. outside the breeding season it shelters in trees and low vegetation, sometimes some distance from water.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Jean-Marc Hero, Ed Meyer, John Clarke

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
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Population

Population
This is a common species.

Population Trend
Stable
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Found in a wide variety of moist forest or woodland habitats. It may be found on reeds and floating vegetation in streams and swamps, but is also common in disturbed habitats such as fruit plantations. During winter it shelters in the crowns of trees well away from water.Breeds in spring and summer. Eggs are attached to stems of grass in ponds. Tadpoles take about 14 weeks to mature.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
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Threats

Major Threats
This species might be adversely affected by habitat loss/degradation associated with coastal development.
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Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

No known declines and large extent of occurrence.

Threats
Commonly relocated in the transportation of fresh produce.

Conservation Measures
None in place.

  • Barker, J., Grigg, G. C., and Tyler, M. J. (1995). A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty and Sons, New South Wales.
  • Cogger, H.G. (1992). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, New South Wales.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are several protected areas within the range of this species.
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Wikipedia

Dainty green tree frog

The dainty green tree frog or graceful tree frog (Litoria gracilenta) is a tree frog native to eastern Queensland, and north-eastern New South Wales, Australia. It ranges from northern Cape York in Queensland to Gosford in New South Wales, with a small and most likely introduced population in Hornsby Heights in Sydney. It is the faunal emblem of the City of Brisbane.[2]

Description[edit]

The dainty green tree frog is a slender, medium-sized frog, reaching a length of 45 millimetres (1.8 in). It is a rich green on its dorsal surface, with a yellow ventral surface. It has a coarse, granular skin with bright orange eyes; some specimens have a light blue ring following the circumference of the eye. The posterior of the thigh is purple-brown or maroon and the tympanum is visible. In most specimens, a thin yellow or white line runs from its nostril to its eye, and this distinguishes it from the closely related red-eyed tree frog (L. chloris) and orange-thighed frog (L. xanothmera), which both lack this line. If this feature is lacking, the granularity of the dorsal surface and size (L. gracilenta is smaller) will separate it from both L. chloris and L. xanothmera.

The fingers of L. gracilenta are three-quarters webbed, while the toes are fully webbed.[3]

Ecology and behaviour[edit]

The dainty green tree frog is commonly found in vegetation emerging from the water in streams and swamps, often in temporary water. It is found in a range of habitats, including rainforest, woodland and forest. It is commonly found near human developments, in gardens or farms and often enters houses looking for insects. Due to its common occurrence on fruit and vegetable farms, particularly bananas, it is commonly transported around Australia with fruits or vegetables, frequently becoming a lost frog. This is common among many frog species, and is of concern due to the much faster rate at which it can spread disease.

This species is usually seen after heavy rain during spring and summer. It breeds in flooded grassland and small ponds.[4] The males will call during summer after rain, and the call is a long "waa" or "wee". Others describe the call as a long, growl-like 'aarrrc' repeated frequently. Males form noisy choruses during summer breeding season."[3] The eggs are laid in a clear jelly lump in water,[3] and are attached to vegetation. Tadpole development takes about 14 weeks. The tadpoles are a dark brown colour, with a clear, yellow tinge on the body wall.

Captive care[edit]

If kept as a pet[5] in Australia, the appropriate permit is required.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jean-Marc Hero, Ed Meyer, John Clarke (2004) Litoria gracilenta. In: IUCN 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2.
  2. ^ Symbols used by Council. brisbane.qld.gov.au
  3. ^ a b c Queensland Museum (2000). Wildlife of Tropical North Queensland. Queensland Museum. Third Printing 2007. ISBN 0-7242-9349-3 p. 173.
  4. ^ Tyler (1992). Encyclopedia of Australian Animals: Frogs. Michael J. Tyler. The National Photographic Index of Australian Wildlife. Angus&Robertson, Pymble, N.S.W. ISBN 0-207-15996-3 p. 20.
  5. ^ Mark Davidson. 2005. Australian Reptile Keeper Publications. ISBN 0-9758200-0-1

Further reading[edit]

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