Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known from Sumatra, Siberut, Borneo (where it has been recorded from many scattered localities), the Philippines, Peninsular Malaysia and India (Arunachal Pradesh State). Records from northern monsoon areas (Thailand, Viet Nam) are probably referable to Rhacophorus verrucosus and Rhacophorus bisacculus (Inger et al., 1999). In the Philippines, it is known from a few mountain localities on Luzon, Leyte, Polillo, Negros, Bohol, Mindanao and Basilan. It probably occurs more widely than current records suggest, especially in areas between known sites.
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Faunal Affinity

Mindanao and Luzon Pleistocene Aggregate Island Complexes (PAIC; Brown and Diesmos, 2002).

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This species is widely distributed in the Philippines, occurring in the Luzon and Mindanao faunal regions.

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is an arboreal species of tropical forest and shrubland. Breeding choruses have been observed at lower elevations in swampy areas and small quiet mountain streams. The tadpoles develop in puddles or small pools of stagnant water.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004

Assessor/s
Arvin Diesmos, Angel Alcala, Rafe Brown, Leticia Afuang, Genevieve Gee, Jeet Sukumaran, Norsham Yaakob, Leong Tzi Ming, Yodchaiy Chuaynkern, Kumthorn Thirakhupt, Indraneil Das, Djoko Iskandar, Mumpuni, Robert Inger, Robert Stuebing, Paul Yambun, Maklarin Lakim

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
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Population

Population
It is only occasionally encountered, but it can then be found in substantial numbers (Dring 1979). In Borneo, rather large breeding choruses have been observed at a number of sites; hence it appears to be abundant. It is uncommon in Sumatra and Siberut in Indonesia. In the Philippines there have been very few records of this species and it is still known from less than five localities.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
Deforestation of lowland areas is the major threat to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Clarification of the taxonomy of the R. appendiculatus complex is required before meaningful conservation measures can be implemented. In the Philippines, the remaining tracts of intact lowland and montane rainforest on the islands where this species occurs should be designated as protected areas. In Borneo, several well-protected parks in Sabah and Sarawak provide refuges for this species, and elsewhere in its range it also occurs in protected areas. Effective preservation of lowland forests in Kalimantan is essential.
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Wikipedia

Frilled tree frog

The frilled tree frog, rough-armed tree frog, or Southeast Asian tree frog (Kurixalus appendiculatus) is a species of frog in the Rhacophoridae family found in Brunei, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam.[2] Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical swamps, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, rivers, swamps, freshwater marshes, and intermittent freshwater marshes. It is threatened by habitat loss.[1]

The size of this frog is 30–37 mm (1.2–1.5 in) in males and 45–50 mm (1.8–2.0 in) in females.[3]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ a b Diesmos, A., Alcala, A., Brown, R., Afuang, L., Gee, G., Sukumaran, J., Yaakob, N., Tzi Ming, L., Chuaynkern, Y., Thirakhupt, K., Das, I., Iskandar, D., Mumpuni, Inger, R., Stuebing, R., Yambun, P., Lakim, M., Dutta, S. & Ohler, A. (2004). "Rhacophorus appendiculatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 22 June 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Frost, Darrel R. (2013). "Kurixalus appendiculatus (Günther, 1858)". Amphibian Species of the World 5.6, an Online Reference. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 22 June 2013. 
  3. ^ "Kurixalus (Rhacophorus) appendiculatus". Amphibians and Reptiles of Peninsular Malaysia. Retrieved 22 June 2013. 
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