Overview

Distribution

Range Description

The geographic distribution of Lepus habessinicus includes Somalia (excluding the southern region, eastern Ethiopia, Djibouti, Eritrea, and minor distribution in Sudan and possible distribution in the extreme north of Kenya (Yalden et al. 1986). It is suspected that this species' distribution is expanding into areas where overgrazing occurs (Flux and Angermann 1990). This species can be found at elevations that range from sea level up to 2,000 m (potentially as high as 2,500 m) (Yalden et al. 1996).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Lepus habessinicus occupies a variety of habitats from open grassland, steppe, and savanna, to desert regions, where some shrub is required for cover (Flux and Angermann 1990). In these habitats, L. habessinicus replaces L. capensis (Flux and Angermann 1990). Other Lepus species occupy areas where shrub cover is denser (Flux and Angermann 1990). It is suspected that L. habessinicus is nocturnal, like the Cape hare (Flux and Angermann 1990). HB length of this species is 40.0-55.0 cm (Happold pers. comm.).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Smith, A.T. & Johnston, C.H.

Reviewer/s
Boyer, A.F. & Johnston, C.H. (Lagomorph Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
Lepus habessinicus is described as a widespread and abundant species (Flux and Angermann 1990). Its distribution may be increasing due to the effects of habitat change produced by overgrazing (Flux and Angermann 1990).

History
  • 1996
    Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
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Population

Population
Lepus habessinicus is considered an abundant species (Flux and Angermann 1990).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
The threats to this species are not known.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is present in Awash National Park, Mago National Park, and possibly Yangudi-Rassa National Park (Yalden et al. 1996). It has been suggested that the range of Lepus habessinicus may be expanding into areas where overgrazing occurs (Flux and Angermann 1990). Research to determine its true geographic distribution should be conducted.
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Wikipedia

Abyssinian hare

The Abyssinian hare (Lepus habessinicus) is a species of mammal in the Leporidae family. It is almost entirely restricted to the nations of the Horn of Africa, though it extends marginally into eastern Sudan and may also occur in far northern Kenya. It has been suggested it should be considered conspecific with the Cape hare, but is considered a separate species based on (presumed) sympatry in their distributions.

References[edit]

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