Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known only from the highlands of southern Sumatra and Java, Indonesia: it occurs as far east on Java as the Ijang plateau (van Bree and Boeadi 1978, Meri et al.2007). On Sumatra, it is known from Bengkulu Province (Sody 1949), where it was found on Mt. Dempo (Lunde and Musser 2003) and recently was recorded north to Gon Kerinci (Holden 2006). ). The northern and central highlands of Sumatra have not been surveyed well enough to say whether or not it occurs there (Meiri et al. 2007). The altitudinal range of this species on Sumatra is 1,000 to 3,000 m (Lunde and Musser 2003, van Bree and Boeadi 1978, Holden 2006).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is restricted to high altitudes of 1,000-2,200 m (Lunde and Musser, 2003), within which habitat use is unclear. Also, there is a recent sighting at 3,000 m, in scrub above the forest line (Holden, 2006).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Duckworth, J.W., Barney, L. & Abramov, A.

Reviewer/s
Belant, J. (Small Carnivore Red List Authority) & Schipper, J. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Data Deficient, as too little is known about its population, ecology or current threats to apply the Red List Criteria. Is therefore unclear if this species is threatened, and more survey work is required in order to have sufficient data on which to assess this species. While there is no strong reason to think that it is, the paucity of recent records despite some level of biological survey in its current range indicates a need to understand its status more clearly.

History
  • 1996
    Endangered
  • 1994
    Insufficiently Known
    (Groombridge 1994)
  • 1990
    Insufficiently Known
    (IUCN 1990)
  • 1988
    Insufficiently Known
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
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Population

Population
Nothing is known about this species’s abundance. It is known from 15 specimens (only twelve of which have locality data) and one field sighting: nine records from Java and four from Sumatra (van Bree and Boeadi, 1978, Lunde and Musser, 2003, Holden 2006, Meiri et al. 2007).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no obvious potential major threats to this species: it is not sought for trade; it lives in Sumatra above the altitudes where general snaring and trapping of ground mammals is intense and where deforestation is heavy; natural habitat on Java in this altitudinal band is heavily fragmented but relatively stable; and the species' dependence, if any, on old-growth, extensive, or even any sort of forest is unknown (Meiri et al. 2007). Doubtless on both islands some are fall victim to non-selective hunting methods, but there is no reason to consider these numbers are large.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It was recorded from Mt. Dempo in Sumatra (part of a protected area system (MacKinnon, 1997) in 1936 (Lunde and Musser, 2003). According to Boeadi (pers. comm. 1986) this species is found in Gunung Gede-Pangrango National Park (15,000 ha) near Bogor, west Java - from where there are historical specimens (van Bree and Boeadi 1978). Schreiber et al (1989) recommends "field work in the mountains of southern Sumatra and Java to locate populations of the mountain weasel and to assess their conservation status and requirements, as well as continuation of conservation efforts on Gunung Slamat in central Java being desirable." Ecology is still too poorly known to recommend conservation measures in the continuing absence of the recommended surveys.
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Wikipedia

Indonesian mountain weasel

The Indonesian mountain weasel (Mustela lutreolina) is a species of weasel that lives on the islands of Java and Sumatra in Indonesia at elevations over 1,000 metres (3,280 ft). They live in mountainous, tropical, and rainforest areas. Indonesian mountain weasels have a body length of 11–12 inches and a tail length of 5–6 inches. They are reddish-brown in color.

The Indonesian mountain weasel is endangered due to hunting, fur trade, and destruction of habitat. There are no subspecies of the Indonesian mountain weasel.

References

  1. ^ Duckworth, J.W., Barney, L. & Abramov, A. (2008). Mustela lutreolina. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 21 March 2009. Database entry includes a brief justification of why this species is of data deficient
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