Physical Description

Type Information

Type for Monodelphis adusta
Catalog Number: USNM 179609
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Mammals
Sex/Stage: Male; Adult
Preparation: Skin; Skull; Skeleton
Collector(s): E. Goldman
Year Collected: 1912
Locality: Cana, Darien, Panama, North America
Elevation (m): 853
  • Type: Goldman, E. A. 1912 Sep 20. Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections. 60 (2): 2.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Mammals

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 4.1 years (captivity) Observations: One specimen lived 4.1 years in captivity (Richard Weigl 2005).
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© Joao Pedro de Magalhaes

Source: AnAge

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Wikipedia

Sepia short-tailed opossum

The Sepia Short-tailed Opossum (Monodelphis adusta) is a species of opossum in the Didelphidae family. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru and Venezuela.[2]

Its habitat consists of different types of forests up to 2200 meters above sea level, as well as grasslands. It rains about 5 m annually so they find ways to remain above the water. The opossum hunts invertebrates on the ground, but remains of beetles and small frogs have also been seen. They are nocturnal and live in tree holes. [3]

Its fur is dark brown, and is distinctive from other species of the genus by having no streaks on its trunk.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gardner, A. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M, eds. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 13. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  2. ^ a b Solari, S. & Tirira, D. (2008). Monodelphis adusta. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 28 December 2008. Database entry includes justification for why this species is of least concern
  3. ^ Gardner, Alfred L. "Order Didelphimorphia: Family Didelphidae." Mammals of South America. Vol. 1. Chicago: University of Chicago, 2007. 85-86.
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