Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Thorny shrubs. Stipules caducous. Leaves simple, entire, serrate or crenate. Flowers in corymbs. Petals 5, white. Stamens numerous. Carpels 5; ovules 2. Styles 5. Fruit red, orange or yellow, with 5 pyrenes.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Ecology

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / internal feeder
larva of Anomoia purmunda feeds within fruit of Pyracantha

Foodplant / gall
Eriosoma lanigerum causes gall of white woolly-covered branch of Pyracantha
Remarks: season: 3-

Foodplant / pathogen
Erwinia amylovora infects and damages flower of Pyracantha

Foodplant / web feeder
communal caterpillar of Malacosoma neustria feeds from web on live leaf of Pyracantha

Foodplant / pathogen
Tubercularia anamorph of Nectria cinnabarina infects and damages branch of Pyracantha
Remarks: season: 1-12

Foodplant / open feeder
caterpillar of Orgyia antiqua grazes on live leaf of Pyracantha
Remarks: season: -7/8

Foodplant / sap sucker
Parthenolecanium corni sucks sap of live shoot of Pyracantha

Foodplant / miner
caterpillar of Phyllonorycter leucographella mines live, upward folding leaf of Pyracantha
Remarks: season: esp winter

Foodplant / sap sucker
hypophyllous Pulvinaria floccifera sucks sap of live leaf of Pyracantha

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:57
Specimens with Sequences:97
Specimens with Barcodes:68
Species:7
Species With Barcodes:6
Public Records:38
Public Species:5
Public BINs:0
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Pyracantha

"Firethorn" redirects here. For the novel, see Firethorn (novel).

Pyracantha is a genus of thorny evergreen large shrubs in the family Rosaceae, with common names firethorn or pyracantha. They are native to an area extending from Southeast Europe east to Southeast Asia, resemble and are related to Cotoneaster, but have serrated leaf margins and numerous thorns (Cotoneaster is thornless).

Flowers

The plants reach up to 6 m (20 ft) tall. The seven species have white flowers and either red, orange, or yellow berries (more correctly pomes). The flowers are produced during late spring and early summer; the pomes develop from late summer, and mature in late autumn.

Species[edit]

Cultivars[edit]

Selected hybrids and cultivars (those marked agm have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit)

  • 'America'
  • 'Firelight'
  • 'Golden Charmer'      
  • 'Golden Dome'
  • 'Lalandei'
  • 'Mohave'
  • 'Navajo'
  • 'Orange Glow'agm[2]      
  • 'Rosy Mantle'
  • 'Santa Cruz'
  • 'Soleil d'Or'
  • 'Teton'agm[3]
  • 'Watereri'

Cultivation[edit]

Pyracanthas are valuable ornamental plants, grown in gardens for their decorative flowers and fruit, often very densely borne. Their dense thorny structure makes them particularly valued in situations where an impenetrable barrier is required. The aesthetic characteristics of pyracanthas, in conjunction with their home security qualities, makes them an alternative to artificial fences and walls. They are also good shrubs for a wildlife garden, providing dense cover for roosting and nesting birds, summer flowers for bees and an abundance of berries as a food source.

Berries[edit]

Pyracantha berries (as are apples, plums, cherries, and almonds[4])are mildly poisonous as they contain Cyanogenic glycosides and can cause mild gastro-intestinal problems when eaten raw in large quantities [5][6];[7] they are edible only when crushed and washed under running water. They have been made into jelly.[8]

Nectar[edit]

In the UK and Ireland Pyracantha and the related genus Cotoneaster are valuable sources of nectar when often the bees have little other forage during the June Gap.

Notes[edit]

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