Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to the Cape Verde Islands where it is found on the islands of Boavista, Santiago and Maio. Its widest distribution is off Boavista where it is found in multiple locations around the coastline, with an area occupied of approx 20 km within a total stretch of approx 40km of coast. It is also present along the northern coast (both east and west) of Maio, 100 km to the south of Boavista, at Baía de Navio Quebrado, Porto Cais and Praia Real in the north for approx 7 km and 12 km to the south at Baía de Pau Seco off the western shores for 4 km (Monteiro et al 2004). There are also several subpopulations in Santiago. In total this species is known from three islands and one islet across multiple locations.

The reports of this species on Sal are now considered to be a different species: Conus ateralbus (Cunha et al. 2008).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found buried in sand under rocks and on rock platforms at depths of between 2 and 15 m (Poppe and Poppe 2011). Adults of the species typically grow to 30-60 mm in length. During the breeding season, this species is commonly encountered in shallow waters. It is inferred from protoconch morphology that this species has non-planktotrophic larval development.

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Tenorio, M.J.

Reviewer/s
Seddon, M. & Monnier, E.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is endemic to the Cape Verde Islands where it is found in multiple locations around Boavista, Sal and Santiago. This species is more widely distributed than many other Cape Verde endemics. With beach tourism on the islands set to expand this could put further stress on populations of this species, however, coastal development is not thought to be significantly impacting the population at present. Future monitoring of the development is warranted. It is currently listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
This species is usually common in the range during the breeding season (M. J. Tenorio pers. comm. 2011). No changes have been seen in the populations during monitoring over the last 10 years so it is considered stable (M. J. Tenorio pers. comm. 2011).

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats

This species is common within its restricted range. It is gathered by shell collectors, however, it is also larger than many other endemic species of Cape Verde Conus. Although there are potential threats from coastal development it is not likely that this will significantly affect the population status in the near future.

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species has a restricted range and would benefit from further research into abundance and threats. There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species. There are already studies of the population genetics for this group (Cunha et al. 2008).
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Wikipedia

Conus venulatus

Conus venulatus is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[1]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Contents

Description

Distribution

References

  1. ^ a b Conus venulatus Hwass in Bruguière, 1792.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 27 March 2010.
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