Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to the Cape Verde Islands where it is found along the western flank off the island of Boavista from Ponto do Rincão in the north to Sal-Rei and continuing south to Morro de Areía, a coastline of approx 26 km in length. A further population is found on the island of Maio, approx 100 km to the SSW along the most northerly point at Navio Quebrado to Baia do Galeão, a coastline of approx 7 km in length (M.J. Tenorio pers. comm. 2011).
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It is a Capeverdian endemic at high risk of extinction.
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This small species is found in sand under rocks in shallow water of 1 to 5 m depth. Adults of the species typically grow to 28 mm in length.

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
NT
Near Threatened

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Tenorio, M.J.

Reviewer/s
Monnier, E. & Seddon, M.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is endemic to the Cape Verde Islands where it is found along the western flank off the island of Boavista from Ponto do Rincão in the north to Sal-Rei and continuing south to Morro de Areía, a coastline of approx 26 km in length. Further populations are found on the island of Maio, along most of the northern coast at Navio Quebrado to Baia do Galeão, a coastline of approx 7 km in length (M.J. Tenorio pers. comm. 2011) .

Although one site on Boavista is vulnerable to pollution events, the rest of its range is relatively undisturbed and the populations are secure, hence the species is assessed as Near Threatened.
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Population

Population
In Boavista the populations are declining whereas the populations on Maio are stable. The species was frequent in collecting samples in the Sal-Rei 20 years ago whereas now it is rare in samples (M.J. Tenorio pers. comm 2011).

In Boavista there are 3 subpopulations, of which one has declined, and on Maio there are 3-4 populations, usually indicated by the different colour forms (M.J. Tenorio pers. comm 2011).

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats

This species is endemic to the islands of Boavista and Maio, Cape Verde, where it is restricted to less than 33 km coast. The populations on Boavista around the Sal-Rei harbour area have shown past declines, and these regions were where some of the greatest abundance of this species used be found. The other two populations on Boavista are not in decline.

The populations around Sal-Rei remain vulnerable to pollution events around the harbour, and from fishing vessels and oil tankers moving in and out of the harbour.

The populations on Maio are considered secure.

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is restricted in range and there are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species.
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Wikipedia

Conus josephinae

Apertural and abapertural views of shell of Conus josephinae Rolán, E.M., 1980, showing variation in the species.
Apertural and abapertural views of shell of Conus josephinae Rolán, E.M., 1980, showing variation in the species.

Conus josephinae is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[2]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Contents

Description

Distribution

This species occurs in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean and in the Mediterranean Sea.

References

  1. ^ olán, E., 1980. Descripcion de Tres Nuevas Especies del Genero Conus Linne, 1758 (Mollusca: Gastropoda), Procedentes del Archipielago de Cabo Verde. Bollettino Malacologico, 16 (3-4 ): 79 -94
  2. ^ Conus josephinae Rolán (Mosquera), 1980.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 27 March 2010.
  • Rolán, E., 1980. Descripcion de Tres Nuevas Especies del Genero Conus Linne, 1758 (Mollusca: Gastropoda), Procedentes del Archipielago de Cabo Verde. Bollettino Malacologico, 16 (3-4 ): 79 -94
  • Tucker J.K. (2009). Recent cone species database. September 4th 2009 Edition
  • Tucker J.K. & Tenorio M.J. (2009) Systematic classification of Recent and fossil conoidean gastropods. Hackenheim: Conchbooks. 296 pp.
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