Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to the island of Sal in the Cape Verde group where it is restricted to the south-west of the island from the northerly point of Baía da Mordeira to the most southerly point of Baía da Santa Maria, including Baía do Algodoeiro midway along its range, being approx 30 km (Monteiro et al. 2004) to Santa Maria in the south, although there is no evidence that they fragment the species populations.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species has been found under rocks from 1 to 5 m (Poppe and Poppe 2011). Adults of the species typically grow to 35 mm in length (M. J. Tenorio pers. comm. 2011).

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Tenorio, M.J.

Reviewer/s
Monnier, E., Seddon, M. & Peters, H.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is considered to be Endangered B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii), as it is found in a restricted range area that is currently changing through the construction of a major tourism infrastructure development. The population of this species has been observed to be declining, and it is also highly restricted in its range, being found only at three locations along a single stretch of coastline of just 30 km. There is a small level of exploitation for the shell trade, however most of the shells are taken from historical collections. Future conservation actions within the range are required to reduce the impact of the developments on future population trends in this species.
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Population

Population
This shell is small (35 mm). Although there are no records of population levels for this species in the literature, the species was once one of most common species in the region, but decline has been observed in the last 10 years. It is now considered to be rare (M. J. Tenorio pers. comm. 2011).

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
The Cape Verde islands are experiencing a major increase in tourism. The island of Sal to which this species is restricted is now subject to major development including a 5 billion euro construction of 425 hectares at Mordeira Bay, consisting of 5,000 residential units, 5 star hotels, two golf courses and a marina (http://www.capeverdedevelopment.com) coincides with the type locality of the species and must be considered the major threat as the populations levels of the species are already observed to be declining (M. J. Tenorio pers. comm. 2011).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The species is not the subject of any conservation actions at present, however some action is required, as population levels have been in declining over the last 10 years. Future developments should include some mitigation plans.
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Wikipedia

Conus cuneolus

Conus cuneolus is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[1]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Description[edit]

Distribution[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Conus cuneolus Reeve, 1843.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 27 March 2010.
Conus cuneolus Reeve, L.A., 1844
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