Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to the south-west of the island of Sal, Cape Verde in the Calheta region from and including Baía da Mordeira to Baía do Algodoeiro (Monteiro et al. 2004), a coast of a projected length of 30 km. The second population (formerly known as Conus venulatus) is on the south-eastern coast of the island.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species has been found among rubble and sand at depths of between 2 and 15 m (Poppe and Poppe 2011). Adults grow to approximately 45 mm in length.

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
B1ab(iii,iv)+2ab(iii,iv)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Tenorio, M.J.

Reviewer/s
Monnier, E. & Seddon, M.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is assessed as Endangered B1ab(iii,iv)+2ab(iii,iv), as it is endemic to two strips of coast on the southern part of the island of Sal, Cape Verde including Baía da Mordeira, a coast of a projected 30 km length. The island of Sal where this species lives is now subject to major development including a 5 bn euro development of 425 hectares at Mordeira Bay, consisting of 5,000 residential units, 5 star hotels, two golf courses and a marina (http://www.capeverdedevelopment.com). This development coincides with the location of the species and must be considered the major threat to the populations, especially at the type locality. There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species. Long-term development plans should incorporate some conservation actions to protect the type locality of this species, as disturbance of the habitats may impact the species.
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Population

Population
There are no records of population levels for this species in the literature. It is common within the range during the breeding season, and is usually found at exposed sites, so the population is easy to estimate. Over the last 10 years the populations have remained stable, however future trends in the western habitats may be declining (M. J. Tenorio, pers. comm. 2011).
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Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats

The Cape Verde islands are experiencing a major increase in tourism. The island of Sal where this species lives is now subject to major development including a 5 bn euro development of 425 hectares at Mordeira Bay, consisting of 5,000 residential units, 5 star hotels, two golf courses and a marina (http://www.capeverdedevelopment.com). This development coincides with the location of the species and must be considered the major threat to the populations.

This species is endemic to the island of Sal, Cape Verde where it is restricted to a 30 km stretch of coastline. In common with many species of marine mollusc of restricted range there maybe a long-term interest in gathering specimen shells, but at present it is not viewed as impacting the population levels of the species, and it is currently providing data for long-term monitoring of the populations.



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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There is a long-term interest in gathering specimen shells, but at present it is not viewed as impacting the population levels of the species, and it is currently providing data for long-term monitoring of the populations.

There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species. Long-term development plans should incorporate some conservation actions to protect the type locality of this species, as disturbance of the habitats may impact the species.
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Wikipedia

Conus ateralbus

Conus ateralbus is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[2]

These snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Contents

Description

The size of an adult shell varies between 29 mm and 48 mm.

Distribution

This marine species occurs in the Atlantic Ocean along the Cape Verdes and in the Mediterranean Sea.

References

  1. ^ Kiener, L. C., 1845. Spécies Général et Iconographie des Coquilles Vivantes, 2
  2. ^ Conus ateralbus Kiener, 1845.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 12 July 2011.
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