Overview

Distribution

It must be differenciated from C. ambiguus, which is not present in the Cape verde Islands, but in West Africa. This is one of only three non-endemic species of Conus in Cape Verde.
  • Rolán E., 2005. Malacological Fauna From The Cape Verde Archipelago. Part 1, Polyplacophora and Gastropoda.
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Range Description

This species is found along the central West African coast from Dakar, Senegal in the north to Angola in the South. It is also found off the shores of the Cape Verde Islands, and the islands of São Tomé and Principe (Monteiro et al. 2004). The EOO/AOO together with the number of locations exceed the thresholds for vulnerability with criteria B1 and B2.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found at depths of between 1 and 30 m (Poppe and Poppe 2011). Adults of the species typically grow to 30–40 mm and can be up to 50 mm in length.

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Monnier, E.

Reviewer/s
Seddon, M. & Tenorio, M.J.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is endemic to the west coast of Africa from south of Dakar, Senegal in the north and extends to Gabon and Angola. In common with all Conus spp. and other molluscs, the shells of this species are traded for the collector market. There are no quantitative data available on the number of shells removed, but it is low level of take and not impacting the species so it is assessed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
The populations are considered to have been stable over the last 10 years and the species is common in suitable habitats in the breeding season in the region (E. Monnier pers. comm. 2011).

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There are localized threats to the species where there are harbour developments and cities (with pollution from industrial sources and sewage).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species and none are considered necessary.
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Wikipedia

Conus tabidus

Conus tabidus is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[1]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

It is possible that this is a Compound species as there are at least two population groupd where the shell morph is identical but the animal, habitat and behavoiur are totally distinct. One personally observed population has a black animal and lives on or under mud in the upper intertidal zone, leaving the sea at night to hunt worms among the roots of vegetation on the foresgore. It has a thick robust periostracum which may be "sunburned". The other population personally collected by Louis Pisani Burnay and others lives in deeper water usually under stones and has a light red animal. The periostracum is brown with transverse spirals of short hairs. The egg capsules of neither group have been observed. Burnay and Monteiro 1977 Seashells from Cape Verde Islands (as C ambiguus Reeve, 1844)

Distribution[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ Conus tabidus Reeve, 1844.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 27 March 2010.
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