Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to the west coast of Africa from south of Dakar, Senegal in the north to the northern border region of Guinea-Bissau with Senegal in the south and including Gambia (Monteiro et al. 2004), a coast of approx 700 km. Monnier and Tenorio (2011 pers.comm.) considered that the species has a range that is disjunct with records from Gabon and Angola. It is a deeper water species, recorded from trawling (M. J. Tenorio pers. comm. 2011).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species has been found and reported on specimen shell websites as having been dredged from under rocks at around 3 m depth, although it can be found in deeper water (30 m). This mollusc will grow to typically 50 mm and can reach 65 mm in length.

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Monnier, E.

Reviewer/s
Tenorio, M.J. & Seddon, M.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is endemic to the west coast of Africa from south of Dakar, Senegal in the north to the northern border region of Guinea-Bissau with Senegal in the south and including Gambia (Monteiro et al. 2004), a coast of approx 700 km. Monnier and Tenero (2011 pers.comm.) considered that the species has a disjunct range that extends to Gabon and Angola. In common with all Conus spp. and other molluscs, the shells of this species are traded for the collector market. There are no quantitative data available on the number of shells removed, but it is low level of take and not impacting the species so it is assessed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
It is not an abundant species, but off-take is not impacting the species and there is no known decline (M. J. Tenorio pers. comm. 2011).

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats

In common with many species of marine mollusc of restricted range they may be at risk from over-gathering for specimen shells and by visiting tourists.

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is restricted in its range and would benefit from further research into abundance and threats before any action plan can be formulated. There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species.
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Wikipedia

Conus ambiguus

Conus ambiguus, common name The Doubtful Cone,[1] is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[3]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Contents

Description

Conus ambiguus was originally discovered and described in both identical Latin and English language texts by Lovell Augustus Reeve in 1844.[1]

Reeve's type description reads as follows:

The Doubtful Cone. Shell turbinated, smooth, ridged towards the base, rather obsoletely engraved with very fine, festooned, longitudinal lines; white, palely stained with light brown; spire obtusely convex, slightly canaliculated, ornamented with arched brownish spots; apex raised and pointed.

The shell of Conus ambiguus is whitish, with obscure, light brown bands, and longitudinal streaks. The spire is ornamented with arched brownish spots.[4]

The height of the shell is 1.5 inches (38 mm).[4]

Dimensions of the shell of type specimen is 39 x 22 mm.[5] The type specimen is stored in Zoölogisch Museum Amsterdam (Zoological Museum of the University of Amsterdam).[5]

Distribution

The type locality was not specified by Reeve.[1]

West Africa.[4]

References

This article incorporates public domain text from references.[1][4]

  1. ^ a b c d e Reeve L. A. (February 1844) Conchologia iconica, or, Illustrations of the shells of molluscous animals. London, 1:
    Conus ambiguus Reeve, L.A., 1844
    f. 244. Plate 54, figure 244.
  2. ^ Kiener L. C. (1845) Iconogrraphie t. 63, figure 2.
  3. ^ a b Conus ambiguus Reeve, 1844.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 20 March 2010.
  4. ^ a b c d Tryon G. W. (1884). Manual of Conchology, structural and systematic, with illustrations of the species. Volume 6. Conidae, Pleurotomidae. page 13. Plate 3, figure 41-42.
  5. ^ a b "Conus ambiguus Reeve, 1844". The Conus Biodiversity website, accessed 20 March 2010.
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