Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Pyrrhosoma nymphula is restricted to the Western Palaearctic and is largely confined to Europe with a small number of populations found in Northern Morocco, northern Tunisia and in the mountains of Southwest Asia. The species is getting less common to the east of its range and is absent from parts of European Russia and most of the eastern Ukraine. To the southeast it extends to the Caucasus and the north of Iran.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
In most of Europe the species is found both in standing and slow flowing waters. In eastern and northern Europe, the species is less common in standing waters and mostly reproduces at running waters. In most cases habitats have rich aquatic vegetation. The species is mostly absent from temporary habitats.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pyrrhosoma nymphula

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2014

Assessor/s
Kalkman, V.J.

Reviewer/s
Suhling, F. & Smith, K.

Contributor/s

Justification

The species is common within its wide range and there are no indications of a decline.

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Population

Population
This species is one of the most common damselflies in large parts of Europe and occurs frequently in large populations.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats

No threats of importance to its global range known. In the Mediterranean it might be impacted by climate change and combined with general habitat degradation, this might locally lead to extinction.

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The species is not considered threatened and no specific conservation actions are required.
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Wikipedia

Large red damselfly

The large red damselfly (Pyrrhosoma nymphula) is a European damselfly.

Habitat[edit]

It inhabits ponds and dikes, and occasionally slow-moving rivers.

Identification[edit]

Females occur in many colour forms, but all have yellow bands around the abdominal segments. They can easily be confused with small red damselflies, but the latter has orange legs, while the large red damselfly has black legs. In Greece and Albania a closely related species occurs, the Greek red damsel (Pyrrhosoma elisabethae). They look very much the same, the females only having a slightly different pronotum with deep folds in the hind margin. The males differ in their lower appendages, which are longer than the upper ones, while the black hook on the lower appendages is half as long as in the large red damselfly. The appendages of the large red damselfly can be seen in the gallery below.

Behaviour[edit]

One of the most common damselflies, the large red damselfly is often the first damselfly to emerge, usually in April or May.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

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