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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Xinjiang [Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan; SW Asia, S Europe].
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S.W. Europe, C. Asia, sometimes cultivated.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Elevation Range

1800 m
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Description

Shrubs or trees, to 8 m tall. Branches dark gray, sometimes spiny; branchlets dark red, glabrous. Winter buds purple; scale margins sometimes sparsely ciliate. Stipules lanceolate, margin glandular serrulate, apex acuminate. Petiole 6–12 mm, usually glabrous or sometimes sparsely pubescent when young, without nectaries; leaf blade elliptic, ovate, obovate, or rarely elliptic-lanceolate, (2–)2–6 × 2–6(–6) cm, abaxially pale green and pubescent on midvein, adaxially dark green and glabrous, base cuneate to subrounded, margin crenate or sometimes doubly crenate, apex acute. Flowers solitary, rarely 2 in a fascicle, 2–2.5 cm in diam. Pedicel 1–2.2 cm, glabrous or sparsely pubescent. Hypanthium outside glabrous. Sepals narrowly ovate, outside glabrous, margin shallowly serrate, apex obtuse. Petals white, oblong to spatulate, base cuneate, margin undulate, apex obtuse. Stamens 25–30. Ovary villous. Stigma disc-shaped. Drupe yellow, red, or black, subglobose to ellipsoid, 2–3 cm in diam., slightly glaucous; endocarp ellipsoid to ovoid, smooth or scabrous, sometimes pitted. Fl. Apr, fr. Aug.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Prunus cerasifera subsp. myrobalana (Linnaeus) C. K. Schneider; P. domestica Linnaeus var. myrobalana Linnaeus; P. sogdiana Vassilczenko.
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Ecology

Habitat

Forests, stream sides in valleys, gravelly slopes, also cultivated; 800--2000 m.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Prunus cerasifera

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Prunus cerasifera

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Management

These species are introduced in Switzerland.
  • Aeschimann, D. & C. Heitz. 2005. Synonymie-Index der Schweizer Flora und der angrenzenden Gebiete (SISF). 2te Auflage. Documenta Floristicae Helvetiae N° 2. Genève.   http://www.crsf.ch/ External link.
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Wikipedia

Cherry plum

Prunus cerasifera is a species of plum known by the common names cherry plum and myrobalan plum.[2] It is native to Europe[3] and Asia.[2]

Wild types are large shrubs or small trees reaching 6-15 m tall, with deciduous leaves 4-6 cm long. It is one of the first European trees to flower in spring, often starting in mid-February. The flowers are white and about 2 cm across, with five petals. The fruit is a drupe, 2-3 cm in diameter, and yellow or red in colour. It is edible, and reaches maturity from early July to mid-September.

This species can be found growing wild where it has escaped cultivation and become naturalized, such as in North America.[4][5]

Cultivated cherry plums can have fruits, foliage, and flowers in any of several colors. Some varieties have sweet fruits that can be eaten fresh, while others are sour and better for making jam.

The cherry plum is a popular ornamental tree for garden and landscaping use, grown for its very early flowering. Numerous cultivars have been developed, many of them selected for purple foliage, such as 'Atropurpurea'.[6][7] These purple-foliage forms (often called purple-leaf plum), also have dark purple fruit, which make an attractive, intensely coloured jam. They can have white or pink flowers. The cultivar 'Thundercloud' has bright red foliage which darkens purple.[8] Others, such as 'Lindsayae', have green foliage. Some kinds of purple-leaf plums are used for bonsai[7] and other forms of living sculpture.

The variety 'Nigra' with black foliage and pink flowers, has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[9]

The cherry plum has been listed as one of the 38 plants that are used to prepare Bach flower remedies,[10] a kind of alternative medicine promoted for its effect on health. However according to Cancer Research UK, "there is no scientific evidence to prove that flower remedies can control, cure or prevent any type of disease, including cancer".[11]


Images of cherry plums
Ripe fruit 
Unripe fruit 


References[edit]

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Notes

Comments

This species is widely cultivated throughout much of China for its fruit and flowers, with many horticultural varieties and forms. The purplish-leaved form, Prunus cerasifera f. atropurpurea (Jacquin) Rehder, is often planted as a garden ornamental in N China.
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