Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Annuals or perennials. Inflorescence a many-flowered panicle, open or contracted, sometimes spike-like. Spikelets 1-flowered, bisexual, laterally flattened, disarticulating above the glumes at maturityGlumes subequal, persistent, 1-nerved; apex acute to acuminate, awnless. Lemma 3-5-nerved, membranous or hyaline; apex truncate or emarginate, awnless or dorsally awned or awned between 2 lobes.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / saprobe
apothecium of Albotricha acutipila is saprobic on dead stem of Agrostis
Remarks: season: 4-8

Foodplant / saprobe
immersed pseudothecium of Botryosphaeria festucae is saprobic on dead leaf of Agrostis
Remarks: season: 6-8

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / pathogen
Cladochytrium caespitis infects and damages rotten root of Agrostis

Foodplant / parasite
Sphacelia anamorph of Claviceps purpurea parasitises inflorescence of Agrostis
Remarks: season: 7

Foodplant / gall
stroma of Epichlo causes gall of stem of Agrostis
Remarks: season: fertile in 8

Foodplant / pathogen
colony of Fusarium anamorph of Fusarium poae infects and damages ear of Agrostis

Foodplant / parasite
colony of Fusoma anamorph of Fusoma biseptatum parasitises Agrostis

Foodplant / pathogen
Gaeumannomyces graminis infects and damages patchily bronze or bleached plant of Agrostis
Remarks: season: late summer-
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / spot causer
acervulus of Colletotrichum coelomycetous anamorph of Glomerella graminicola causes spots on dead stem of Agrostis
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
colony of Helminthosporium dematiacous anamorph of Helminthosporium stenacrum is saprobic on dead leaf (basal) of Agrostis
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / parasite
numerous sorus of Jamesdicksonia dactylidis parasitises live leaf of Agrostis
Remarks: season: 8-9

Foodplant / saprobe
immersed pseudothecium of Keissleriella culmifida is saprobic on dead stem of Agrostis
Remarks: season: 5-10

Foodplant / pathogen
strand of Laetisaria fuciformis infects and damages dying plant of Agrostis
Remarks: season: 9-10

Foodplant / saprobe
scattered, initially immersed pseudothecium of Leptosphaeria culmifraga is saprobic on dead stem of Agrostis
Remarks: season: spring, summer

Foodplant / saprobe
colony of Cercosporidium dematiaceous anamorph of Mycosphaerella recutita is saprobic on dead sheath of Agrostis

Foodplant / saprobe
pycnidium of Hendersonia coelomycetous anamorph of Phaeosphaeria vagans is saprobic on dead stem of Agrostis

Foodplant / saprobe
perithecium of Phomatospora dinemasporium is saprobic on dead sheath of Agrostis
Remarks: season: 6-7

Foodplant / spot causer
embedded stroma of Phyllachora graminis causes spots on live leaf of Agrostis

Foodplant / parasite
hypophyllous, plurilocular stroma of Placosphaeria coelomycetous anamorph of Placosphaeria graminis parasitises fading leaf of Agrostis

Foodplant / spot causer
immersed, crowded or in rows pycnidium of Pseudoseptoria coelomycetous anamorph of Pseudoseptoria donacis causes spots on sheath of Agrostis
Remarks: season: 5-7

Foodplant / parasite
telium of Puccinia recondita f.sp. agrostidis parasitises live leaf of Agrostis

Foodplant / spot causer
immersed stromatic of Rhynchosporium coelomycetous anamorph of Rhynchosporium secalis causes spots on live sheath of Agrostis

Foodplant / pathogen
immersed stroma of Pseudocercosporella dematiaceous anamorph of Tapesia yallundae infects and damages live stem of Agrostis

Foodplant / parasite
embedded sorus of Urocystis agrostidis parasitises live culm of Agrostis

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Known predators

Agrostis (Agrostis, Agropyron, Stipa, Helianthus) is prey of:
Homo sapiens
Microtus ochrogaster
Geomyidae
Spermophilus
Orthoptera
Elateridae
Noctuidae

Based on studies in:
Canada: Manitoba (Forest)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • R. D. Bird, Biotic communities of the Aspen Parkland of central Canada, Ecology, 11:356-442, from p. 410 (1930).
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:302Public Records:119
Specimens with Sequences:223Public Species:23
Specimens with Barcodes:220Public BINs:0
Species:62         
Species With Barcodes:44         
          
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Agrostis

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Agrostis

Agrostis (bent or bentgrass) is a genus of over 100 species belonging to the grass family Poaceae,[1] commonly referred to as the bent grasses. Among this group are some of the main traditional lawn grasses.

Selected species[edit]

Uses[edit]

Some species of bents are commonly used for lawn grass. This is a desirable grass for golf course tees, fairways and greens.

Bentgrass is used in turf applications for its numerous advantages: it can be mowed to a very short length without damage, it can handle a great amount of foot traffic, it has a shallow root system that is thick and dense allowing it to be seeded and grow rather easily, and it has a pleasing, deep green appearance. The name "bent" refers to the shallow roots, which bend just below the surface of the soil to propagate laterally.

Creeping Bent[edit]

(Agrostis stolonifera) is the most commonly used species of Agrostis. Historically, it was often called Orcheston long grass, after a village on Salisbury Plain. It is cultivated almost exclusively on golf courses, especially on putting greens. Creeping Bent aggressively produces horizontal stems, called stolons, that run along the soil's surface. These allow Creeping Bent to form dense stands under conducive conditions and outcompete bunch-type grass and broadleaf weeds. As such, if infested in a home lawn, it can become a troublesome weed problem. The leaves of the bentgrass are long and slender.

Common Bent[edit]

(Agrostis capillaris) was brought to America from Europe. This was the type of grass that was used on the lawns of most estates. It is the tallest of the bents with very fine texture and like most bent grasses grows very dense. Although this species has been used on golf courses and sporting fields it is better suited for lawns. Colonial Bent is fairly easy to grow from seeds and fertilization of the lawn is not as intense. This grass also takes longer to establish than Creeping Bent. However it does not require the intense maintenance.

Velvet Bent[edit]

(Agrostis canina) gets it name for the velvet appearance that this grass produces. It has the finest texture of all the bent grasses. This grass was used in Europe for estate lawns and golf courses because it could be cut so short. Velvet bent grass requires similar upkeep and maintenance to Creeping Bent. Velvet Bent has recently had a resurgence in the UK due to the high demands on greens from inclement weather and speed expectations. This species also has a lighter color than the two previous species.

Butterfly foodplant[edit]

Butterflies whose caterpillars feed on Agrostis include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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