Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Glabrous herbs, generally occurring in wet places. Leaves flat or cylindric, sometimes septate. Inflorescence compound, paniculate, bracteate; bracteoles sometimes present immediately below and clasping the flower. Perianth segments free, ovate or lanceolate, entire, persistent.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 8 specimens in 2 taxa.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1 - 1
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Associations

Foodplant / sap sucker
adult of Agramma laetum sucks sap of Juncus
Remarks: Other: uncertain

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Plant / associate
fruitbody of Agrocybe paludosa is associated with Juncus

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Aphanisticus emarginatus feeds on Juncus

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Aphanisticus pusillus feeds on Juncus

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Bagous lutulosus feeds on Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
apothecium of Belonopsis iridis is saprobic on dead stem of Juncus
Remarks: season: 6

Foodplant / saprobe
sessile apothecium of Belonopsis juncicola is saprobic on dead culm of Juncus
Remarks: season: 8

Foodplant / saprobe
apothecium of Belonopsis junciseda is saprobic on dead Juncus

Plant / resting place / on
larva of Bolothrips dentipes may be found on base of Juncus
Remarks: season: 7-9

Foodplant / saprobe
basidiome of Cellypha goldbachii is saprobic on dead leaf of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
slender-stalked apothecium of Ciboria juncorum is saprobic on fallen fruit of Juncus
Remarks: season: 6

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Clitopilus hobsonii is saprobic on dead, decayed debris of Juncus
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Coniophora prasinoides is saprobic on old, dead stem of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Coprinopsis friesii is saprobic on decayed culm of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Coprinopsis martinii is saprobic on decayed debris of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
often buried under desne layers of decayed grass leaves fruitbody of Coprinopsis urticicola is saprobic on decayed debris of Juncus
Remarks: season: summer

Foodplant / sap sucker
adult of Cymus melanocephalus sucks sap of Juncus

Plant / associate
Cyrtorhinus caricis is associated with base of clump of Juncus

Foodplant / feeds on
Discula coelomycetous anamorph of Discula junci feeds on Juncus

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Dolerus ferrugatus grazes on leaf of Juncus
Other: sole host/prey

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Dolerus madidus grazes on leaf of Juncus
Other: sole host/prey

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Dolerus triplicatus grazes on leaf of Juncus
Other: sole host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
pycnidium of Ascochyta coelomycetous anamorph of Eriospora leucostoma is saprobic on dead leaf of Juncus
Remarks: season: 2-4

Foodplant / sap sucker
adult of Eurygaster testudinaria sucks sap of Juncus
Other: major host/prey

Plant / grows among
fruitbody of Galerina jaapii grows among Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
apothecium of Gorgoniceps micrometra is saprobic on dead leaf of Juncus
Remarks: season: 4

Plant / resting place / on
adult of Haplothrips juncorum may be found on live flower of Juncus
Remarks: season: 6-9

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Hemimycena delectabilis is saprobic on dead leaf of Juncus
Other: major host/prey

Plant / associate
fruitbody of Hygrophoropsis fuscosquamula is associated with Juncus

Plant / associate
fruitbody of Hygrophoropsis macrospora is associated with Juncus

Plant / associate
fruitbody of Hypholoma myosotis is associated with Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
superficial stroma of Hypocrea spinulosa is saprobic on decaying stem of Juncus
Remarks: season: 8-11
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
immersed, then revealed apothecium of Hysteropezizella rehmii is saprobic on dead Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Jaapia argillacea is saprobic on decayed, dead leaf of Juncus

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Kateretes rufilabris feeds on Juncus

Foodplant / parasite
Ligniera junci parasitises live root hair of Juncus

Foodplant / gall
Livia juncorum causes gall of flower shoot of Juncus

Fungus / saprobe
numerous, often confluent pycnothyrium of Actinothyrium coelomycetous anamorph of Lophodermium apiculatum is saprobic on dead Juncus
Remarks: season: 3-8
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
superficial perithecium of Loramyces juncicola is saprobic on dead stem of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Marasmiellus candidus is saprobic on dead litter of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Marasmiellus vaillantii is saprobic on debris of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Marasmius limosus is saprobic on dead, decaying leaf of Juncus
Other: unusual host/prey

Foodplant / feeds on
Mecomma ambulans feeds on Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Melanotus phillipsii is saprobic on dead, decayed debris of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
thyriothecium of Morenoina fimbriata is saprobic on dead stem of Juncus
Remarks: season: mainly 5

Foodplant / saprobe
thyriothecium of Morenoina minuta is saprobic on dead stem of Juncus
Remarks: season: mainly 5

Foodplant / saprobe
thyriothecium of Morenoina paludosa is saprobic on dead stem of Juncus
Remarks: season: mainly 5

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Mycena bulbosa is saprobic on dead, decayed, wet debris of Juncus
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Mycocalia minutissima is saprobic on dead, fallen, decaying, wet leaf of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Mycocalia sphagneti is saprobic on dead culm of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
pseudothecium of Mycosphaerella recutita is saprobic on Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
stalked sporodochium of Myrothecium dematiaceous anamorph of Myrothecium masonii is saprobic on Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
sessile apothecium of Nimbomollisia eriophori is saprobic on dead leaf of Juncus
Remarks: season: 6-10

Foodplant / saprobe
apothecium of Niptera pulla is saprobic on dead Juncus
Remarks: season: 3-5

Plant / associate
fruitbody of Omphalina mutila is associated with dead, decayed debris of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
effuse colony of Chaetochalara dematiaceous anamorph of Phaeoscypha cladii is saprobic on Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
superficial conidioma of Dinemasporium coelomycetous anamorph of Phomatospora dinemasporium is saprobic on dead leaf of Juncus
Remarks: season: 1-12

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Pterula caricis-pendulae is saprobic on wet, dead, decayed debris of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Pterula debilis is saprobic on dead stem of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Resinomycena saccharifera is saprobic on dead, decayed debris of Juncus

Plant / associate
Thryogenes nereis is associated with Juncus

Plant / resting place / on
fruitbody of Tomentella ferruginea may be found on dead, decayed debris of Juncus
Other: unusual host/prey

Plant / resting place / on
fruitbody of Tomentella radiosa may be found on dead, decayed debris of Juncus
Other: unusual host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Trechispora minima is saprobic on dead, decayed debris of Juncus

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Typhula quisquiliaris is saprobic on dead, decayed culm of Juncus
Other: unusual host/prey

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 632
Specimens with Sequences: 780
Specimens with Barcodes: 621
Species: 120
Species With Barcodes: 102
Public Records: 198
Public Species: 54
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Juncus sp2

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Juncus sp1

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Juncus

Juncus is a genus of monocotyledonous flowering plants, commonly known as rushes. It is the largest genus in the family Juncaceae, containing around 300 species.[1]

Description[edit]

Rushes of the genus Juncus are herbaceous plants that superficially resemble grasses or sedges.[2] They have historically received little attention from botanists; in his 1819 monograph, James Ebenezer Bicheno described the genus as "obscure and uninviting".[3]

The form of the flower differentiates rushes from grasses or sedges. The flowers of Juncus comprise five whorls of floral parts: 3 sepals, 3 petals (or, taken together, 6 tepals), 2–6 stamens (in two whorls) and a stigma with three lobes.[2] The stems are round in cross-section, unlike those of sedges,[2] which are typically somewhat triangular in cross-section.[4]

In Juncus section Juncotypus (formerly called Juncus subg. Genuini),[5] which contains some of the most widespread and familiar species, the leaves are reduced to sheaths around the base of the stem and the bract subtending the inflorescence closely resembles a continuation of the stem, giving the appearance that the inflorescence is lateral.[6]

Distribution and ecology[edit]

Juncus has a cosmopolitan distribution, with species found throughout the world, with the exception of Antarctica.[1] They typically grow in cold of wet habitats, and in the tropics, are most common in montane environments.[2]

Classification[edit]

In Juncus effusus (and other species in J. sect. Juncotypus), the bract appears as a continuation of the stem, and the inflorescence appears lateral.

The genus Juncus was first named under the rules of the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants by Carl Linnaeus in his 1753 Species Plantarum. The type species of the genus was designated by Frederick Vernon Coville in 1913; he chose the first species in Linnaeus' account, which was Juncus acutus.[5] Juncus can be divided into two major groups, one group with cymose inflorescences that include bracteoles, and one with racemose inflorescences with no bracteoles.[5]

The genus is divided into the following subgenera and sections:[5]

  1. sect. Juncus
  2. sect. Graminei (Engelm.) Engelm.
  3. sect. Caespitosi Cout.
  4. sect. Stygiopsis Kuntze
  5. sect. Ozophyllum Dumort.
  6. sect. Iridifolii Snogerup & Kirschner
  • Juncus subg. Poiophylli Buchenau
  1. sect. Tenageia Dumort.
  2. sect. Steirochloa Griseb.
  3. sect. Juncotypus Dumort.
  4. sect. Forskalina Kuntze

Species[edit]

The Plant List accepts the following species in the genus Juncus:[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ralph E. Brooks & Steven E. Clemants (2000). "Juncus". Magnoliophyta: Alismatidae, Arecidae, Commelinidae (in part), and Zingiberidae. Flora of North America 22. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-513729-9. 
  2. ^ a b c d D. M. D. Yakandawala, U. M. Sirisena & M. D. Dassanayake (2005). "Two new records of Juncus species (rush family – Juncaceae) in Sri Lanka" (PDF). Ceylon Journal of Science 33: 67–76. 
  3. ^ James Ebenezer Bicheno (1819). "XVII. Observations on the Linnean genus Juncus, with the characters of those species, which have been found growing wild in Great Britain". Transactions of the Linnean Society of London 12 (2): 291–337. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8339.1817.tb00229.x. 
  4. ^ Peter W. Ball, A. A. Reznicek & David F. Murray. "210. Cyperaceae Jussieu". In Flora of North America Editorial Committee. Magnoliophyta: Commelinidae (in part): Cyperaceae. Flora of North America 23. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-515207-4. 
  5. ^ a b c d Jan Kirschner, Lázaro J. Novara , Vladimir S. Novikov, Sven Snogerup & Zdeněk Kaplan (1999). "Supraspecific division of the genus Juncus (Juncaceae)". Folia Geobotanica 34 (3): 377–390. doi:10.1007/BF02912822. JSTOR 4201385. 
  6. ^ K. L. Wilson & L. A. S. Johnson (2001). "The genus Juncus (Juncaceae) in Malesia and allied septate-leaved species in adjoining regions" (PDF). Telopea 9 (2): 357–397. 
  7. ^ "Juncus". The Plant List. Retrieved October 23, 2013. 
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