Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is wide-ranging and occurs across the Indian Ocean. Its range extends from the east coast of Africa, throughout Oceania to the Hawaiian Islands (Rockel et al. 1995). However, locations on the east coast of Africa are doubtful (G. Raybaudi and S. Veldsman pers. comm. October 2011).

Kohn (1959) reported that this species was rare on the Hawaiian islands, with the mean number of individuals per 100 square kilometres equalling 0.03. Therefore this wide-ranging species appears to be rare across a proportion of its range.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species can be found on smooth, intertidal benches which are covered by a thin layer of algae (Leviten and Kohn 1980). It can also be found on coral reefs, sand, rubble and algal turf (Röckel et al. 1995). Predators of this species are thought to include other gastropods, octopodes, crabs and starfish (Kohn 1959).

Typical size for shells of this species is between 27-69 mm in length (Röckel et al. 1995). It is considered a very old species (G. Raybaudi pers. comm. October 2011).

Systems
  • Marine
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Raybaudi-Massilia, G.

Reviewer/s
Veldsman, S.G. & Peters, H.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is wide-ranging and occurs across the Indian Ocean. Its range extends from the east coast of Africa, throughout Oceania to the Hawaiian Islands. Although it has been reported as rare in some areas there are no currently known threats to its population as a whole. Declines have been observed in the Western Pacific, potentially at least partly due to predation by starfish, but these are currently not deemed significant enough to warrant a listing in a threatened or Near Threatened category. It has therefore been classified as Least Concern. However, research on population numbers may be beneficial to keep a check on recent declines in parts of its range.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
The size of the this species' population is currently unknown but it could be declining. Dead shells have been excavated in the Maldives, suggesting an extinct local population (Rockel et al. 1995). Furthermore this cone snail is reported as rare in Hawaii (Kohn 1959), the Enewetak Atoll (Devaney 1987) and in the Mascarenes (Austrailianseashells.net 2010). This species has never been common throughout its range (G. Raybaudi pers. comm. October 2011).

Population Trend
Decreasing
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
The species may be suffering from predation by starfish which may explain part of the observed declines (G. Raybaudi pers. comm. October 2011).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no current conservation measures in place for this species. Declines have been observed in the Western Pacific, so that research on population numbers may be beneficial to this species.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Conus retifer

Conus retifer is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[1]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Contents

Description

Distribution

References

  1. ^ a b Conus retifer Menke, 1829.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 27 March 2010.
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!