Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is found from the Philippines to New Guinea and the Solomon Islands; also Queensland, and Vanuatu (Röckel et al. 1995). It is found from 3-400 m.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology

This species usually lives at depths of 3-50 m, more commonly deeper than 20 m, though in the Philippines they occur at depths of 120-400 m (Röckel et al. 1995). Populations occur in upper subtidal areas, mostly on muddy sand substrate. This species can grow to 50 mm (Röckel et al. 1995).


Systems
  • Marine
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Depth range based on 4 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 2 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 48 - 68.5
  Temperature range (°C): 27.098 - 27.098
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.997 - 0.997
  Salinity (PPS): 34.279 - 34.279
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.222 - 4.222
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.280 - 0.280
  Silicate (umol/l): 5.500 - 5.500

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 48 - 68.5
 
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Tagaro, S., Raybaudi-Massilia, G., Poppe, G. & Kohn, A.

Reviewer/s
Bouchet, P. & Peters, H.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is found from the Philippines to New Guinea and the Solomon Islands; also Queensland, and Vanuatu. It is found in a wide depth range, considered to be locally common, not known to have any major threats, and is likely to be found in marine protected areas. It is listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
There are currently no data in the literature concerning populations of this species. This species is locally common.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats known to affect this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The range of this species is likely to overlap several marine protected areas in the region.
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Wikipedia

Conus mucronatus

Conus mucronatus, common name the deep-groved cone, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[2]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

There is one subspecies: Conus mucronatus segondensis Fenzan, 2008

Contents

Description

The size of an adult shell varies between 18 mm and 50 mm. The shell is acuminately turbinated, attenuated towards the base, with revolving grooves throughout. These grooves are crossed by revolving striae. The color of the shell is whitish, somewhat clouded with pale brown. The spire is spotted with brown. [3]

Distribution

This species occurs in the Indian Ocean along the Mascarene Basin; in the Pacific Ocean along the Philippines to Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Queensland, Australia, and Vanuatu; along India and in the South China Sea.

References

  1. ^ Reeve, L. A., 1843. Monograph of the genus Conus. Conchologia Iconica, i: figures and descriptions of the shells of molluscs; with remarks on their affinities, synonymy, and geographical distribution, 1. Conus
  2. ^ a b Conus mucronatus Reeve, 1843.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 1 August 2011.
  3. ^ George Washington Tryon, Manual of Conchology vol. VI, p. 72; 1879
  • Drivas, J. & M. Jay (1988). Coquillages de La Réunion et de l'île Maurice
  • Filmer R.M. (2001). A Catalogue of Nomenclature and Taxonomy in the Living Conidae 1758 - 1998. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 388pp.
  • Tucker J.K. (2009). Recent cone species database. September 4th 2009 Edition
  • Tucker J.K. & Tenorio M.J. (2009) Systematic classification of Recent and fossil conoidean gastropods. Hackenheim: Conchbooks. 296 pp

Gallery

Below are several color forms and one subspecies:

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