Overview

Brief Summary

Conus genuanus, common name the garter cone, is a species of sea snail. Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. The ground color of the shell is pink-brown or violaceous brown, with revolving narrow lines of alternate white and chocolate quadrangular spots and dashes. This species occurs in the Atlantic Ocean from the Canary Islands and Cape Verde to Angola; in the Indian Ocean along Madagascar.

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Distribution

Range Description

This species is widely distributed along the coast of West Africa from Senegal in the north to Angola in the south, including the Cape Verde islands and São Tomé e Príncipe islands off the coast of Gabon. Further specimens have been found in the Canary Islands although in small numbers (Monteiro et al. 2004). The coast along which this species lives is in excess of 8,500 kms length.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species has been found in mud and sand at depths ranging from 1 m down to 20 m (Poppe and Poppe 2011). Adults of the species can grow to 80 mm in length, but typically are less than 50 mm.

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Tenorio, M.J.

Reviewer/s
Seddon, M. & Monnier, E.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is wide-ranging along the tropical western coast of Africa, including the Cape Verde Islands. Although it is extensively gathered for its highly attractive shell, there does not appear to be any shortage of specimens in the market. It is categorised as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
This species is commonly found in suitable habitats at the right time of the year.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
The threats are very localised from pollution and harbour extensions, and are not impacting the species (M.J. Tenorio per. comm. 2011).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species and none are considered necessary.
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Wikipedia

Conus genuanus

Conus genuanus, also known as Genuanoconus genuanus, common name the garter cone, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[2]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Contents

Description

The size of an adult shell varies between 33 mm and 75 mm. The ground color of the shell is pink-brown or violaceous brown, with revolving narrow lines of alternate white and chocolate quadrangular spots and dashes. These lines are usually alternately larger and smaller. The surface of the shell is usually smooth, but sometimes the lines are slightly elevated. The spire is smooth.[3]

Distribution

This species occurs in the Atlantic Ocean from the Canary Islands and Cape Verde to Angola; in the Indian Ocean along Madagascar.

References

  1. ^ Linnaeus, C., 1758. Systema Naturae per Regna Tria Naturae, 10th ed., 1
  2. ^ a b Conus genuanus Linnaeus, 1758.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 24 July 2011.
  3. ^ George Washington Tryon, Manual of Conchology vol. VI, p. 15; 1879
  • Bernard, P.A. (Ed.) (1984). Coquillages du Gabon [Shells of Gabon]. Pierre A. Bernard: Libreville, Gabon. 140, 75 plates pp.
  • Pin, M.; Tack, K.D.L. (1995). Les cônes du Sénégal. [The Conidae of Senegal]. La Conchiglia 277(Suppl.): 1-55,
  • Gofas, S.; Afonso, J.P.; Brandào, M. (Ed.). (S.a.). Conchas e Moluscos de Angola = Coquillages et Mollusques d'Angola. [Shells and molluscs of Angola]. Universidade Agostinho / Elf Aquitaine Angola: Angola. 140 pp.
  • Filmer R.M. (2001). A Catalogue of Nomenclature and Taxonomy in the Living Conidae 1758 - 1998. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden. 388pp.
  • Rolán E., 2005. Malacological Fauna From The Cape Verde Archipelago. Part 1, Polyplacophora and Gastropoda
  • Tucker J.K. & Tenorio M.J. (2009) Systematic classification of Recent and fossil conoidean gastropods. Hackenheim: Conchbooks. 296 pp
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