Overview

Distribution

Distribution: also from Far East <420>.
  • Stephenson, W. (1972). An annotated checklist and key to the Indo-Pacific swimming crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Portunidae). Royal Society of New Zealand Bulletin No. 10.
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 1 specimen in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 44 - 44
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Portunus trituberculatus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 23
Specimens with Barcodes: 24
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data: Portunus trituberculatus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 8 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

ACATTATATTTTATTTTTGGAGCATGATCAGGAATAGTAGGAACTTCACTT---AGTCTAATTATTCGTGCTGAATTAGGACAACCCGGTACTCTTATTGGCAAC---GACCAAATTTACAATGTTGTAGTCACAGCTCATGCTTTCGTCATGATTTTCTTTATAGTTATACCAATCATAATTGGAGGATTCGGTAATTGATTAGTACCCCTAATA---TTAGGAGCTCCTGATATAGCCTTCCCCCGTATAAATAACATAAGATTCTGACTTCTTCCTCCTTCATTAACTCTTCTTCTTATAAGAGGTATAGTAGAAAGAGGTGTAGGTACTGGATGAACTGTATATCCTCCTCTTTCTGCCGCAATTGCCCATGCCGGTGCATCAGTAGACTTAGGA---ATTTTTTCTCTTCATTTAGCAGGAGTTTCATCTATTTTAGGTGCAGTAAATTTTATAACCACTGTTATTAATATACGATCTTTTGGTATAAGAATAGACCAAATACCACTATTTGTATGATCGGTATTTATTACTGCAATTCTTCTTCTTTTATCTCTCCCTGTTCTGGCAGGA---GCTATTACTATACTTCTCACAGATCGTAATTTAAATACTTCATTCTTCGACCCTGCCGGGGGTGGAGACCCCGTTCTTTACCAACATCTC------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------TTC
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Portunus trituberculatus

Portunus trituberculatus, the gazami crab, Japanese blue crab or horse crab, is the most widely fished species of crab in the world. It is found off the coasts of East Asia and is closely related to Portunus pelagicus.

Contents

Fishery

P. trituberculatus is the world's most heavily fished crab species, with over 300,000 tonnes being caught annually, 98% of it off the coast of China.[2]

Distribution

P. trituberculatus is found off the coasts of Japan, Korea, China and Taiwan.[3]

Description

The carapace may reach 15 centimetres (5.9 in) wide, and 7 cm (2.8 in) from front to back. P. trituberculatus may be distinguished from the closely related (and also widely fished) P. pelagicus by the number of broad teeth on the front of the carapace (3 in P. trituberculatus, 4 in P. pelagicus) and on the inner margin of the merus (4 in P. trituberculatus, 3 in P. pelagicus).[2]

Taxonomy

P. trituberculatus was first described by Edward J. Miers in 1876, under the name Neptunus trituberculatus.[1]

References

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Source: Wikipedia

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