Overview

Brief Summary

Biology

Adults of this single-brooded moth fly during the day in June and early July (2). Populations occurring on moorland tend to fly later in the season (4), and show a preference for warm sunny weather (2). The caterpillars are present in July and August and live inside birch (Betula) or bog myrtle (Myrica gale) leaves, located at the tips of branches, which they spin together and feed on from inside. The pupal stage overwinters (2) either amongst moss or in spun leaves (4).
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Description

The common name 'Argent and Sable' which was given to this species in 1778 refers to the colour of the moth. Argent is a silvery-white colour and sable is black, both terms especially used in heraldry (4). Both the fore- and hindwings are white in colour with variable black markings (3). The caterpillar has a stumpy appearance, and is dark green in colour with a black head and a black line passing along the length of the back (3).
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Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Range

This moth has a wide distribution in England, but now occurs in scattered colonies following a decline throughout most of the range (1). In Scotland it is found in the Hebrides, the north-west and the southern uplands (4). It also has a wide distribution in Europe and is found in North America, Japan, China, Korea, Siberia and Amur (1).
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Ecology

Habitat

Inhabits open un-grazed bogs and moors (4) and is also found in woodlands with regenerating birches (1).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Rheumaptera hastata

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 11 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

AACTTTATATTTTATTTTTGGAATTTGAGCTGGAATAGTTGGCACTTCATTAAGATTATTAATTCGAGCTGAACTAGGAAATCCAGGTTCTTTAATTGGAGATGATCAAATTTATAATACTATTGTTACTGCTCATGCTTTTATTATAATTTTTTTTATAGTAATACCTATTATAATTGGAGGATTTGGAAATTGATTAGTTCCTTTAATATTAGGAGCCCCTGATATAGCCTTCCCACGAATAAATAATATAAGATTTTGACTACTTCCCCCATCTCTTACGCTTCTAATTTCTAGAAGAATTGTAGAAAATGGAGCTGGAACTGGATGAACAGTTTATCCCCCTTTATCCTCTAATATTGCTCATGGAGGAAGATCTGTAGACTTAGCAATTTTTTCTTTACATTTAGCTGGTATTTCTTCAATTTTAGGGGCAATTAATTTTATTACAACTATTATTAATATACGATTAAATAATATATTTTTTGATCAATTACCTTTATTTGTATGAGCAGTAGGAATTACTGCCTTTCTTTTATTACTTTCTTTACCTGTATTAGCAGGAGCTATTACTANNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rheumaptera hastata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 6
Specimens with Barcodes: 136
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Status

Classified as Nationally Scarce in Great Britain (1).
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Threats

The Argent and Sable has suffered due to the decline in traditional management of woodlands such as coppicing. This has resulted in a decrease in young regenerating birch in rides and at the periphery of woodlands. Intensive sheep grazing on moorland has also affected birch regeneration (1).
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Management

Conservation

The Species Action Plan aims to maintain all current populations with enhancement by the year 2010 (1). A number of populations occur within Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs), and three key areas where the species is present have been targeted by The Forestry Commission's Coppice for Butterflies Challenge. Measures taken to conserve this species will be likely to aid other moth species that inhabit coppiced woodlands such as the Orange Upperwing (Jodia croceago), the Clay Fan-foot (Paracolax tristalis) and the Drab Looper (Minoa murinata) (1).
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Wikipedia

Argent and Sable

Argent and sable moths or Rheumaptera hastata are day flying moths of the Geometridae family, with distinctive black and white colourings. They tend to live on wetlands and hillsides. The larvae spin together the leaves of their food plants (such as Birch and Bog myrtle) to form their cocoons. It was named in 1778, after the heraldic color names for black and white.

Caterpillar

References[edit]

Rheumaptera on funet.fi [1]


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