Overview

Comprehensive Description

General Description

Once thought to be the second brood of the Boreal Spring Azure (C. lucia), the Summer Azure flies later in the year, is slightly larger, and has a paler upperside. The underside lacks the extensive black-brown markings of lucia, and is paler overall. Subspecies argentata occurs in southern Manitoba and Saskatchewan, and our populations may belong to this taxon as well.
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Distribution

East-central Alberta east to southern Ontario and New Brunswick (Layberry et al. 1998), south to Florida and Texas (Opler 1999). Known from only two localities in Alberta, from Buffalo Lake where it was found by Gerrie Hilchie, and near Dinosaur Provincial Park (Beck et al. 2002).
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occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: Most of eastern and central United States and south to Florida and Texas as well as southern Canada (Opler et al 2010).

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Ecology

Habitat

Unknown in Alberta; likely near prairie and parkland shrub thickets.
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Comments: A great variety of brushy and wooded habitats.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

No data on larval or adult food sources are available for western Canada; Layberry et al. (1998) report late-blooming flowers such as dogwoods (Cornus spp.), meadowsweet (Spiraea spp.) and viburnums (Viburnum spp.) as larval hosts.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

One yearly brood; flies from late June to early July in Saskatchewan (CBIF 2002).
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Comments: Two to four broods in most of range from spring until late summer, although at least in southern New Jersey some pupae from the first brood diapause until spring while siblings eclose in a few weeks.

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Life Cycle

No data is available for Alberta; the immature stages are similar to the Boreal Spring Azure (Layberry et al. 1998).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Celastrina neglecta

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 8 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

AAAGATATTGGAACATTATATTTTATCTTCGGAATTTGAGCAGGTATATTAGGAACATCATTA---AGAATCTTAATTCGTATAGAATTAGGAACACCAGGATCATTAATTGGAGAT---GATCAAATTTATAATACTATTGTCACAGCTCATGCTTTTATTATAATTTTTTTTATAGTTATACCTATTATAATTGGAGGATTTGGAAATTGATTAATTCCTTTAATA---TTAGGAGCACCTGATATAGCATTCCCTCGAATAAATAATATAAGATTTTGATTATTACCTCCATCTTTGATATTATTGATTTCAAGAAGAATTGTAGAAAATGGAGCAGGAACAGGATGAACAGTGTACCCCCCACTATCATCTAATATTGCACATAGTGGATCATCTGTAGATCTA---GCAATTTTCTCATTACATTTGGCAGGTATTTCATCAATTTTAGGAGCTATTAATTTTATTACAACTATTATTAATATACGAGTAAATAATTTATCTTTTGATCAAATATCATTATTTATCTGAGCAGTAGGAATTACAGCACTATTACTTCTTCTTTCTTTACCTGTTTTAGCTGGT---GCTATTACTATATTATTAACTGATCGAAATCTTAATACTTCATTTTTTGACCCTGCTGGAGGAGGAGACCCAATTTTATATCAACATTTATTTTGATTTTTTGGACATCCAGAAGTTTATATTTTAATTTTACCTGGATTTGGAATTATTTCTCATATTATTTCTCAAGAAAGAGGTAAAAAA---GAAACTTTTGGGTCTTTAGGTATAATTTATGCTATATTAGCTATTGGTTTATTAGGATTTATTGTATGAGCTCATCATATATTTACAGTAGGTATAGATATTGATACTCGAGCTTATTTCACCTCTGCCACTATAATTATTGCTGTACCAACAGGAATCAAAATTTTCAGTTGATTA---GCAACT
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Celastrina neglecta

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 8
Specimens with Barcodes: 24
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

Of special concern; further field work is needed to map the extent of Alberta populations.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Celastrina neglecta

The Summer Azure (Celastrina neglecta) is a butterfly of the Lycaenidae family. It is found in North America. Layberry, Hall, and Lafontaine, in The Butterflies of Canada, describe the species:

The upper surface is pale blue with an extensive dusting of white scales, especially on the hindwing. In some females the blue is almost entirely replaced by white with a small amount of blue near the wing bases. Females have a broad blackish-grey band on the outer third and costa of the forewing. The underside is chalky white to pale grey with tiny dark grey spots and a zigzagged submarginal line on the hindwing.[1]

Wingspan is 23 to 29 mm (0.91 to 1.14 in).

The Summer Azure occurs across most of eastern and central United States as well as southern Canada from Nova Scotia to southern Saskatchewan. Adults fly from mid-June until early October with two or three generations in the south.[2]

The taxonomic status of this butterfly, originally described as Lycaena neglecta Edwards, 1862, has been in flux over the years. It was at one time treated as a synonym of Celastrina argiolus lucia (Lycaena lucia Kirby, 1837).[3]

Similar Species[edit]

References and external links[edit]

  1. ^ Layberry, Ross. A., Peter Wl. Hall, and J. Donald Lafontaine. The Butterflies of Canada. University of Toronto Press, 1998. Reproduced with permission at Summer Azure, Canadian Biodiversity Information Facility
  2. ^ Jim P. Brock and K. Kaufman. Kaufman Field Guide to Butterflies of North America, New York, NY:Houghton Mifflin, 2003.
  3. ^ Eliot, J.N.; Kawazoe, A. (1983). Blue butterflies of the Lycaenopsis group. London. 


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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: As currently understood, this species includes essentially all eastern azures with two or more annual generations. Such populations use a wide array of flowers as foodplants. It is possible that this is a complex of essentially indistinguishable species, but evidence for that it equivocal at best. Treatment of the various azures as subspecies by some popular guides is totally untenable, since at least three and probably four of the so-called "subspecies" can occur in the same hectare in New Jersey, and two or three are often seen together. At least two are sympatric in about half the USA.

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