Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / spot causer
epiphyllous colony of Spermosporina anamorph of Spermosporina aricola causes spots on live leaf of Arum
Remarks: season: 4

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:159
Specimens with Sequences:169
Specimens with Barcodes:162
Species:28
Species With Barcodes:28
Public Records:155
Public Species:28
Public BINs:0
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Arum

For other uses, see Arum (disambiguation).
Historical model at Botanical Museum Greifswald

Arum is a genus of flowering plants in the family Araceae, native to Europe, northern Africa, and western and central Asia, with the highest species diversity in the Mediterranean region.[1][2] Frequently called "arum lilies", they are not closely related to the true lilies Lilium. Plants in the closely related tribe Zantedeschia are also called "arum lilies".

They are rhizomatous, herbaceous perennial plants growing to 20–60 cm tall, with sagittate (arrowhead-shaped) leaves 10–55 cm long. The flowers are produced in a spadix, surrounded by a 10–40 cm long, coloured spathe, which may be white, yellow, brown or purple; some species are scented, others not. The fruit is a cluster of bright orange or red berries.

All parts of the plants are poisonous,[3] containing significant amounts of calcium oxalate as raphides.

The genus name is Latinized form of the Greek name for these plants, aron.

Species[edit]

Formerly placed here:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
  2. ^ Govaerts, R. & Frodin, D.G. (2002). World Checklist and Bibliography of Araceae (and Acoraceae): 1-560. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  3. ^ Nelson, L. et al (2007) Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants. New York Botanical Garden.
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