Overview

Distribution

Xizang [NW India, Kashmir, Nepal, Pakistan, Sikkim].
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Afghanistan, Himalaya (Kashmir to Nepal), Tibet.
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Distribution: Pakistan (Himalayas, Hindukush), India, Nepal and Western Myanmar.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Subshrubs 10-15 cm tall. Rhizomes horizontal, ligneous. Branches densely tufted, terete, herbaceous, glabrous. Basal leaves shortly petiolate; leaf blade gray-green abaxially, green adaxially, oblanceolate or lanceolate, 5-10 × 1-1.8 cm, subleathery, both surfaces glabrous, midvein large, base narrowly cuneate, margin revolute, apex acute. Cauline leaves subsessile, smaller; ocrea brown, tubular, ca. 1 cm, membranous, veins numerous, glabrous, apex oblique, not ciliate, usually lacerate. Inflorescence terminal, spicate, erect, dense, large, 3-6 cm, 1-1.5 cm in diam.; bracts ovate, membranous. Pedicels longer than perianth. Perianth purple-red, 5-parted; tepals obovate, ca. 4 mm. Stamens 8; anthers purple. Styles 3, connate at base; stigmas capitate. Achenes included in persistent perianth, dark brown, shiny, ellipsoid, trigonous, ca. 3 mm, base narrowly cuneate, apex acute. Fl. Jul-Aug, fr. Aug-Sep.
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Elevation Range

3500-4800 m
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Description

Densely tufted, 10-25 cm high, glabrous with woody rootstock, perennial, branched herb. Leaves basal as well as cauline, sessile or shortly petiolate. Basal leaves 3.25-6.0 x 1.0-2.0 cm, elliptic to ovate or obovate, subsessile to petiolate, obtuse to acute, crenulate, glaucous beneath; cauline leaves few, 2.5-4.0 x 0.8-1.2 cm, narrowly lanceolate to lanceolate, obtuse to acute. Ochrea 4-10 mm long, tubular, brown with prominent veins. Inflorescence a pedunculate, 2-4 cm spicate head. Ochreolae ovate-obovate, 2.5-4 x 2-3 mm,. Flowers pedicellate, 2.5-3.0 (-3.5) mm across. Pedicel 2-3 mm long. Tepals 5, biseriate, pink, 3-4 x 1-2 mm, elliptic, obtuse to acute. Stamens 8, biseriate, inner series with long filaments. Ovary trigonous with free and long styles, stigma rounded. Nuts 2-2.5 x 1-2 mm, trigonous, dark brown, smooth and shining.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Bistorta affinis (D. Don) Greene; Persicaria affinis (D. Don) Ronse Decraene; Polygonum donianum Sprengel.
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Synonym

Polygonum affine D. Don, Prodr., Fl. Nep. 70. 1825; Hook. f., Fl. Brit. Ind. 5: 33. 1886; Schiman-Czeika & Rech.f. in Rech.f., Fl. Iran. 56: 62. 1968; R. R. Stewart, Ann. Cat. Vasc. Pl. W. Pak. & Kashm. 202. 1972; Bhopal & Chaudhri in Pak. Syst. 1(2): 80. 1977; Polygonum donianum Spreng. Syst. 4: 154. 1827; P. brunonis Wall. in Royle, Ill. Bot. Himal. Mount. 317. t. 80. 1839; Persicaria affinis (D. Don) Ronse Decr. in Bot. J. Linn. Soc. 98. 368. 1988.
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Ecology

Habitat

Grassy slopes, rocky fissures; 4000-4900 m.
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A common alpine and subalpine species, grows on open slopes, edges and rocky places on higher altitudes from 3000-4800 m, quite variable especially in the habit, leaf and peduncle length. On the higher altitudes, the plant tends to become semiprostrate to ± cushion-like with erect floral axis. However, this variation seems to be ± continuous or clinal in nature.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl. Per.: June-September.
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Wikipedia

Persicaria affinis

Persicaria affinis (fleece flower, knotweed) is a species of flowering plant in the family Polygonaceae, native to the Himalayas. Formerly known as Polygonum affine, other synonyms include Bistorta affinis and Polygonum brunonis.

Description[edit]

P. affinis is a creeping, densely tufted, mat-forming perennial, growing to 25 cm (10 in) tall by 60 cm (24 in) broad. The narrow elliptic leaves are glaucous beneath. Leaves are mostly at the base, 3–8 cm long, with the base narrowed to a short stalk. Leaf margins are entire or very finely toothed. The mid-vein is prominent. Cylindrical spikes of many pale pink or rose-red flowers are borne at the top of short erect stems, from midsummer to Autumn. Flower-spikes are 5–7.5 cm (2–3 in) long, with densely crowded flowers. Stamens slightly protrude out of the flowers. Flowering stems are several, 5–25 cm tall, with very few smaller leaves. When the flowers have died, they tend to persist on the plant into winter.[1]

Habitat[edit]

P. affinis is found in the Himalayas, from Afghanistan to E. Nepal, at altitudes of 3,000–4,800 m (9,843–15,748 ft).[2]

Cultivation[edit]

The plant is used ornamentally as groundcover. The following cultivars have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit:-

References[edit]

  1. ^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964. 
  2. ^ "Kew Gardens - Plants & fungi - Persicaria affinis". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  3. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Persicaria affinis 'Darjeeling Red'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  4. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Persicaria affinis 'Donald Lowndes'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  5. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Persicaria affinis 'Superba'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
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Notes

Comments

The rhizome is used for making tea and used in the same way as that of the following species, Bistorta amplexicaulis.
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