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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Stems ca. 50 cm, branched from base, densely stellate, yellow glandular. Petiole 4-6 mm; leaf blade linear-lanceolate, 4-5(-6) cm × 4-9 mm, base cuneate, 1-pinnatipartite; lobes oblong to ovate, 2-4 × 1-1.5 mm, sparsely stellate, densely yellow glandular, apex obtuse. Verticillasters in lax racemes or panicles 10-15 cm; floral leaves linear, 0.8-1.7 cm × 0.8-3 mm; bracts violet, ovate to elliptic, ca. 0.7 × 0.4 mm, deciduous, membranous, margin white ciliate. Pedicel 1-1.5 mm, densely pubescent, spreading to pendulous. Calyx 5-6 × 1.5-2.5 mm, purple, base densely white or purple hirsute, yellowish glandular, margin ciliate, apex sparsely pubescent to subglabrous, tube 4-5 × 1.5-2 mm; upper lip ca. 1 × 2 mm, obscurely 3-denticulate; lower lip nearly as long as upper lip. Corolla blue, ca. 1 cm, glabrous, sparsely glandular, tube 5-6 × 2 mm; upper lip 3-3.5 × 4-4.5 mm, dark purple lineate; lobes elliptic to ovate, middle lobes ca. 1.5 × 1 mm, lateral lobes ca. 1 × 1.5 mm; lower lip oblong-elliptic, ca. 3 × 1 mm, margin entire, apex obtuse. Nutlets ca. 2 × 1 mm, obtuse. Fl. Jun-Jul, fr. Jul-Aug.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Perovskia pamirica C. Y. Yang & B. Wang.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat & Distribution

* Xinjiang, Xizang.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Perovskia atriplicifolia

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Perovskia atriplicifolia

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Perovskia atriplicifolia

Perovskia atriplicifolia, Russian sage, is a flowering herbaceous perennial plant or subshrub that is native to central Asia in an area that includes Afghanistan, Iran, Pakistan, and Tibet.[1] Despite its common name, Russian sage is not in the same genus as other Salvias, which are commonly called "sage".

The specific epithet atriplicifolia means "with leaves like Atriplex".[2]

The intense fragrance of Russian sage is similar to some of the true sages. It was a relatively unknown landscaping plant until the 1990s, despite being mentioned by well known landscape authors such as Gertrude Jekyll and Russell Page.[3]

Description[edit]

Russian sage grows on upright, grayish white stems that are 1 to 1.3 m (3.3 to 4.3 ft) tall, with lobed, deeply notched silvery-grey leaves that are approximately 5 cm (2.0 in) by 3 cm (1.2 in) wide. Older stems are woody at the base, and younger stems are herbaceous and square in cross section. The stems and leaves give off a pungent odor when crushed or bruised. In late summer and autumn, Russian sage produces spires of small, tubular flowers of blue or lavender colour. These spires may grow up to 30 cm long, and last up to two or three months. Russian sage grows in a clump, up to 1.5 m tall with a spread of up to 60 cm, although cultivars may be smaller. It is considered a sub-shrub.

It requires full sun, but is hardy and cold tolerant. It is also tolerant of dry, chalky soils with a high pH, salt tolerant and drought tolerant.

Uses[edit]

Cultivation[edit]

Popular cultivar 'Blue Spire', which has darker blue flowers, may actually be a hybrid of P. atriplicifolia and P. abrotanoides, although it is typically marketed as P. atriplicifolia.[4] It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[5]

Culinary and medicinal[edit]

In its native habitat, the flowers are eaten fresh, and the leaves are smoked like tobacco for its euphoriant properties.[3] It is also used where it grows in Pakistan and Balochistan for dysentery.[6] In Eurasian herbalism, this plant has a long history of use as a febrifuge.[7]

Although research and data is limited, some identified compounds in this plant include thujone, miltirone, oxy-miltirone, tanshinones, camphor, limonene, α-globulol, trans-caryophyllene, α-humulene, camphene, α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, γ-cadinene, and α-terpinyl acetate.[8]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Proctor, Rob; Denver Water (1999). Xeriscape Plant Guide: 100 Water-Wise Plants for Gardens and Landscapes. Golden, Colo: Fulcrum Publishing. p. 107. ISBN 1-55591-253-2. 
  2. ^ Harrison, Lorraine (2012). RHS Latin for gardeners. United Kingdom: Mitchell Beazley. p. 224. ISBN 9781845337315. 
  3. ^ a b Gardner, Jo Ann (1998). Herbs in bloom: a guide to growing herbs as ornamental plants. Portland, Or: Timber Press. p. 236. ISBN 0-88192-698-1. 
  4. ^ Cox, Jeff (2002). Perennial All Stars. Rodale Press. p. 242. ISBN 978-0-87596-889-6. 
  5. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Perovskia atriplicifolia 'Blue Spire'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  6. ^ Tareen, Rasool Bakhsh; Tahira Bibi; Mir Ajab Khan; Mushtaq Ahmad; Muhammad Zafar (2010). "Indigenous knowledge of folk medicine by the women of Kalat and Kuzhdar regions of Balochistan, Pakistan". Pakistan Journal of Botany 42 (3): 1465–1485. Retrieved 2010-08-30. 
  7. ^ Perovskia atriplicifolia, Plants for a Future
  8. ^ Jassbi, Amir Reza; \Viqar Uddin Ahmad, Rasool Bakhsh Tareen (January–February 1999). "Constituents of the essential oil of Perovskia atriplicifolia Benth.". Flavour and Fragrance Journal 14 (1): 38–40. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1099-1026(199901/02)14:1<38::AID-FFJ778>3.0.CO;2-8. 
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