Overview

Distribution

S Xizang, Yunnan (Mojiang Hanizu Zizhi Xian, Luxi Xian) [Bhutan, India, Nepal, Sikkim].
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E. Himalaya (Nepal to NEFA).
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Physical Description

Morphology

Elevation Range

2700-3100 m
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Description

Shrubs or small trees, 2--6 m tall. Branchlets subquadrangular to subterete, with scattered stellate and glandular hairs, glabrescent. Leaves sessile or with petiole to 1 cm and with same indumentum as branchlets; leaf blade narrowly elliptic to subelliptic, 7--16 X 2--6 cm, covered with stellate and scattered glandular hairs when young, glabrescent, base cuneate to rounded or decurrent, margin serrate, apex acuminate. Inflorescences terminal and in axils of upper leaves, paniculate or thyrsoid cymes, 7--23 X 4--6 cm. Calyx campanulate, 6--8 X 4--8 mm, tube 4--5 mm; lobes ovate to triangular, 1.5--3 X 1.5--3 mm, outside densely stellate tomentose with glandular hairs or with glandular and more or less scattered stellate hairs, inside with glandular hairs. Corolla purple to wine red, 2.3--3 cm; tube broadly cylindrical, (1.2--)1.7--2.1 cm, base 5--8 mm in diam., throat to 9 mm in diam.; lobes suborbicular, 5--10 X 5--10 mm, outside with some stellate and glandular hairs but soon glabrescent, inside pilose at throat, margin crenate. Stamens inserted 2--6 mm below mouth; anthers oblong, 2.5--5 mm, apex obtuse to apiculate. Ovary ovoid, 5--8 mm, stellate tomentose. Style long, thick, glabrous or basally stellate tomentose; stigma capitate. Capsules ellipsoid, 1--1.6 X 0.6--0.8 cm, glabrous or stellate tomentose. Seeds oblong, 1--1.5 mm, unwinged. Fl. Jun-Sep.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Buddleja sessilifolia B. S. Sun ex S. Y. Pao.
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Ecology

Habitat

Open forests, thickets, open places; 1600--4200 m.
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Wikipedia

Buddleja colvilei

Buddleja colvilei is endemic to the eastern Himalaya; discovered by Hooker in 1849, he declared it 'the handsomest of all Himalayan shrubs' [1] The species was awarded the RHS First Class Certificate (FCC) in 1896. [2]

Description[edit]

B. colvilei is a deciduous large shrub or small tree which can grow > 13 m, often single stemmed. The flowers are arranged in drooping panicles, 15–20 cm long by > 8 cm wide, rose pink to crimson, but often white within the corolla tube. The flowers are among the largest of any in the genus, and appear in June. The leaves are < 25 cm long, narrow, shallowly - toothed, and tapered at either end.[1] This species has a high degree of polyploidy with a correspondingly high chromosome number of 2n = 152–456 (8x–24x).[3]

Cultivation[edit]

The shrub is not entirely hardy in the UK, and can only be reliably grown outdoors along the Atlantic coast.[1]Hardiness: USDA zones 8–9. [4]

Cultivars[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bean, W. J. (1914). Trees and shrubs hardy in the British Isles. 7th Ed. 1950, Vol. 1, p. 320.
  2. ^ Hillier & Sons. (1990). Hillier's Manual of Trees & Shrubs, 5th ed.. p. 47. David & Charles, Newton Abbot. ISBN 0-7153-67447
  3. ^ Chen, G, Sun, W-B, & Sun, H. (2007). Ploidy variation in Buddleja L. (Buddlejaceae) in the Sino - Himalayan region and its biogeographical implications. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society. 2007, 154, 305 – 312. The Linnean Society of London.
  4. ^ Stuart, D. D. (2006). Buddlejas. RHS Plant Guide. Timber Press, Oregon. ISBN 978-0-88192-688-0
  • Leeuwenberg, A. J. M. (1979) The Loganiaceae of Africa XVIII Buddleja L. II, Revision of the African & Asiatic species. Mededelingen Landbouwhogeschool Wageningen, Nederland.
  • Phillips, R. & Rix, M. (1989). Shrubs, Pan Books, London.
  • Li, P. T. & Leeuwenberg, A. J. M. (1996). Loganiaceae, in Wu, Z. & Raven, P. (eds) Flora of China, Vol. 15. Science Press, Beijing, and Missouri Botanical Garden Press, St. Louis, USA. ISBN 978-0915279371 online at www.efloras.org
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