Overview

Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Agastache rugosa (Fisch. & C.A. Mey.) Kuntze:
Japan (Asia)
Russian Federation (Asia)
South Korea (Asia)
China (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Stems erect, 0.5-1.5 m tall, to 7-8 mm in diam., finely pubescent upward, branched, base glabrous. Leaves gradually reduced upward; petiole 1.5-3.5 cm; leaf blade cordate-ovate to oblong-lanceolate, 4.5-11 × 3-6.5 cm, adaxially subglabrous, abaxially puberulent, glandular, base cordate or rarely cuneate, margin serrate, apex caudate-acuminate. Spikes compact, cylindric, 2.5-12 × 1.8-2.5 cm; floral leaves lanceolate-linear, less than 5 × 1-2 mm basally, 2-3 mm apically; peduncles of cymes ca. 3 mm. Calyx ± purplish or purple-red, tubular-obconical, ca. 8 × 2 mm, glandular puberulent, yellow glandular, throat slightly oblique; teeth triangular-lanceolate, 3 posterior teeth ca. 2.2 mm, 2 anterior teeth slightly shorter. Corolla purplish blue, ca. 8 mm, puberulent outside; tube base ca. 1.2 mm wide, slightly exserted, gradually dilated to ca. 3 mm wide at throat; upper lip straight, apex emarginate; middle lobe of lower lip larger, ca. 2 × 3.5 mm, spreading, margin undulate; lateral lobes semicircular. Ovary apex tomentose. Nutlets brown, ovoid-oblong, ca. 1.8 × 1.1 mm, adaxially ribbed, apically hirtellous. Fl. Jun-Sep, fr. Sep-Nov.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Lophanthus rugosus Fischer & C. Meyer, Index Sem. Hort. Petrop. 1: 31. 1835; Elsholtzia monostachya H. Léveillé & Vaniot; L. argyi H. Léveillé ; L. formosanus Hayata.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat & Distribution

Widely distributed, but cultivated as a medicinal plant in China [Japan, Korea, Russia; North America]
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Agastache rugosa

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Agastache rugosa

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Agastache rugosa

Agastache rugosa (Korean Mint, Blue Licorice, Purple Giant Hyssop, Huo xiang, Indian Mint, Patchouli Herb, Wrinkled Giant Hyssop; syn. Lophanthus rugosus Fisch. & C.A.Mey.) is a medicinal and ornamental plant in the Lamiaceae family.

Traditional uses[edit]

In Korea, it is called (방아잎, bangannip), and used for Korean pancake and stew, more specifically for Bosintang and Chu-eo-tang. Chu-eo-tang is a soup or stew cooked with Chinese muddy loach. It is called (Chinese: ; pinyin: huò xiāng)[2] in Chinese and it is one of the 50 fundamental herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine.[3] Chemicals isolated from Agastache rugosa have some antibacterial properties.[4] The extracts have shown antifungal activity in in vitro experiments.[5] Agastache rugosa may have anti-atherogenic properties.[6]

Chemical constituents[edit]

Chemical compounds found in the plant include:[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Agastache rugosa information from NPGS/GRIN". USDA. Retrieved 2008-02-19. 
  2. ^ "Agastache rugosa in Flora of China @ efloras.org". Archived from the original on 3 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-19. 
  3. ^ "Agastache rugosa - Plants For A Future database report". Archived from the original on 3 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-14. 
  4. ^ Production of antibacterial substance against bovine pneumoniae bacteria from Agastache rugosa Jang B.-G., Lee D.-H., Lee J.-S. Korean Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 2005 33:2 (142-147)
  5. ^ Antifungal effect of extracts of 32 traditional Chinese herbs against intestinal Candida in vitro Deng J.-H., Wang G.-S., Ma Y.-H., Shi M., Li B. World Chinese Journal of Digestology 2010 18:7 (741-743)
  6. ^ Inhibition of cytokine-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression; possible mechanism for anti-atherogenic effect of Agastache rugosa Hong J.-J., Choi J.-H., Oh S.-R., Lee H.-K., Park J.-H., Lee K.-Y., Kim J.-J., Jeong T.-S., Oh G.T. FEBS Letters 2001 495:3 (142-147)
  7. ^ "Species Information". Dr. Duke's Phytochemical and Ethnobotanical Databases. Retrieved 2008-02-19. 
  8. ^ 4-Methoxycinnamaldehyde inhibited human respiratory syncytial virus in a human larynx carcinoma cell line Wang K.C., Chang J.S., Chiang L.C., Lin C.C. Phytomedicine 2009 16:9 (882-886)
  9. ^ Chemical composition of essential oil in stems, leaves and flowers of Agastache rugosa Yang D., Wang F., Su J., Zeng L. Zhong yao cai = Zhongyaocai = Journal of Chinese medicinal materials 2000 23:3 (149-151)
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Notes

Comments

Used medicinally for abdominal pain and as the source of an essential oil.
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