Overview

Distribution

Xinjiang (Gongliu) [Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia (European part, Siberia E to Angara Sayan); NW Africa (Algeria), SW Asia, Europe (except Mediterranean region)].
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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herbs, perennial, 35-100 cm tall, all parts to sepals crisped-pubescent to -puberulous (longer on stem), erect from creeping and rooting base, with few branches. Stems terete, eglandular. Leaves subsessile or with petiole to 1.5 mm; blade ovate-oblong to elliptic, 1.7-5(-6) × 1-2 cm; thickly papery, abaxially paler; laminar glands pale, scattered dots; main lateral veins 2- or 3-paired, tertiary reticulation dense; base broadly cuneate, margin entire and plane, apex obtuse. Inflorescence many flowered, from 3-6 nodes, sometimes with subsidiary branches from 1-4 nodes below, the whole narrowly pyramidal to cylindric, 3.5-25 × 1.5-6 cm; bracts and bracteoles lanceolate to linear-lanceolate, black-glandular-ciliate. Flowers ca. 9 mm in diam., stellate; buds ellipsoid, apex obtuse. Sepals shortly united, narrowly oblong to lanceolate or linear-lanceolate, subequal, (2.5-)3.5-4 × 0.7-1 mm; laminar glands pale, streaks to dots; marginal glands black, on cilia or denticles; margin glandular-ciliate to -denticulate, apex subacute; veins 3. Petals bright [or rarely pale] yellow, sometimes red-veined, oblong-elliptic, 1-1.2 cm × ca. 5 mm, 2-3 × as long as sepals; laminar glands sparse, pale, lines to dots; margin sparsely black-glandular-ciliate. Stamens 24-30, longest 7-10 mm, 0.7-0.8 × as long as petals. Ovary ovoid; styles 2-6 mm, 1.3-2.5 × as long as ovary. Capsule ovoid or oblong-ovoid to conic, 4-7 × 3-5 mm, 1.5-2 × as long as sepals. Seeds brown, ca. 1 mm. Fl. Jul-Aug, fr. Sep. 2n = ?16, 18.
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Ecology

Habitat

Wooded valleys and slopes; below 2800 m.
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Associations

Foodplant / open feeder
adult of Chrysolina hyperici grazes on flower of Hypericum hirsutum
Remarks: season: early 6-2

Foodplant / open feeder
nocturnal adult of Chrysolina varians grazes on live leaf of Hypericum hirsutum
Remarks: season: 6-10,3-

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / saprobe
scattered, covered pycnidium of Phomopsis coelomycetous anamorph of Diaporthe picea is saprobic on dead stem of Hypericum hirsutum
Remarks: season: 7

Foodplant / parasite
cleistothecium of Erysiphe hyperici parasitises Hypericum hirsutum

Foodplant / parasite
hypophyllous, caeomoid aecium of Melampsora hypericorum parasitises live leaf of Hypericum hirsutum
Remarks: season: 5-10

Foodplant / spot causer
mainly epiphyllous, brown pycnidium of Septoria coelomycetous anamorph of Septoria hyperici causes spots on fading leaf of Hypericum hirsutum
Remarks: season: 8-10

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Hypericum hirsutum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hypericum hirsutum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Hypericum hirsutum

Hypericum hirsutum is a flowering plant in the genus Hypericum commonly known as hairy St John's wort. It is found in Western Europe.

Description[edit]

Hypericum hirsutum is a downy perennial plant that grows to two or three feet. It has erect stems and opposite pairs of untoothed, elongated oval leaves with translucent glandular dots. The terminal inflorescences have many pale yellow flowers. Each has five pointed sepals with stalked black dots on the margins. The five petals also may have black dots and the many stamens are in bundles. Hairy St John's wort is very similar to common St John's wort (H. perforatum) but can be distinguished by the downy stems and the much longer leaves.[1]

Habitat[edit]

H. hirsutum grows in poor grassland on well-drained clay, limy and chalky soils. It is often found at the edges of woodland, on river banks and roadside verges. It is found throughout Western Europe,[2] and in the United Kingdom it flowers from July to August.[3]

Chemical composition[edit]

Miquelianin (Quercetin 3-O-glucuronide), a type of phenolic compound, is present in H. hirsutum.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McKlintock, D. and R. S. R. Fitter. The Pocket Guide to Wild Flowers. (1956) Collins, London. P29.
  2. ^ Hypericum hirsutum Flora Europaea. Retrieved 2011-09-13.
  3. ^ Hypericum hirsutum Emorsgate Seeds. Retrieved 2011-09-13.
  4. ^ Miquelianin and other polyphenols from Hypericum hirsutum. G. M. Kitanov, Chemistry of Natural Compounds, Volume 24, Number 1, pages 119-120, doi:10.1007/BF00597593
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Notes

Comments

Hypericum hirsutum is the only Chinese Hypericum with hairy stems and leaves.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: This Eurasian species has been recently found in Toronto, Ontario, Canada for its first record in North America. The common name 'Hairy St. John's-wort' is very much is use as a vernacular in Europe is also used by Hypericum setosum in North America.

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