Overview

Comprehensive Description

Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Western Ghats & Eastern Ghats, Moist Deciduous to Evergreen Forests"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Brief

"Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1 Year Assessed: 2010 Assessor/s: Zhuang, X. Reviewer/s: Juffe Bignoli, D., Meng, M., Nophasead, L., Khampheng, H. & Homsombath, K. Justification: This plant is found throughout a wide geographic range. There is no information on its major threats. Research is recommended to learn more about its uses, population trends and threats. It is listed as Least Concern due to its wide distribution and the lack of major widespread threats. Conservation Actions: No conservation information on this species. Some research is recommended to study how this plant is utilized, population trends and global threats. List of Conservation Actions: 1, 1.1, 1.2, 3, 3.2, 4, 4.3, 5, 5.1, 5.1.2"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Brief

Flowering class: Dicot Habit: Herb
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

General Description

Herbs perennial, forming aerial portion only for a few months during early summer. Stem erect or climbing, branched distally, 9-32 cm, forming a tuber to 8 mm in diameter. below ground, glabrous or with black, papillose glands. Basal leaves densely whorled, or absent in some populations, exstipulate, yellowish green to green; petiole 2-8 mm; leaf blade peltate, orbicular to suborbicular, 2-4 mm long, 6-8 mm wide; some leaves reduced, linear, ca. 2 mm. Cauline leaves alternate, remote, exstipulate, yellowish green; petiole 0.8-1.3 cm; leaf blade peltate or lunate to semiorbicular, 2-3 mm long, 4-5 mm wide, margin glandular hairy. Inflorescence terminal; cincinnus 2-6 cm, 3-22-flowered; bracts cuneate to oblanceolate or subulate; pedicels 0.6-2 cm. Sepals 5-7, united near base, yellowish green, lanceolate to ovate, 2-4 mm long, ca. 1.5 mm wide, glabrous to glandular hairy, apex 5-7-fid. Petals usually white, rarely pink or red, oblong-cuneate, 4-6 mm long, 2-3 mm wide. Stamens 5, 2-4 mm. Ovary subglobose, ca. 1.5 mm in diameter; placentas 3; styles 3, 2-5-parted, ca. 0.8 mm; stigma 2- or 3-fid. Capsule subglobose, 2-5-valved, 2-4 mm. Seeds ellipsoid-ovoid to globose, ca. 0.4 mm; venation scrobiculate.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Wen, Jun

Source: Plants of Tibet

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Range Description

Widespread from east and southeast Asia to Australia. In China, it occurs in Anhui, Gansu, Guangdong, Guangxi, west of Guizhou, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, southwest of Sichuan, Taiwan, south of Xizang, Yunnan, and Zhejiang. Recorded from Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam, Cambodia, and Lao PDR. In Lao PDR it has been recorded in Xiangkhoang Province.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

"Karnataka: Chikmagalur, Coorg, Hassan, Mysore Kerala: Idukki, Kollam, Kottayam, Kozhikode Malapuram, Palakkad, Pathanamthitta, Thiruvananthapuram, Thrissur, Wynad Tamil Nadu: Coimbatore, Dindigul, Kanniyakumari, Madurai, Nilgiri, Salem, Theni, Tirunelveli"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

"
Global Distribution

Indo-Malesia to Australia and East Asia

Indian distribution

State - Kerala, District/s: Palakkad, Kottayam, Kozhikkode, Idukki, Kollam, Pathanamthitta, Thiruvananthapuram, Thrissur, Wayanad

"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

"Range Description: Widespread from east and southeast Asia to Australia. In China, it occurs in Anhui, Gansu, Guangdong, Guangxi, west of Guizhou, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, southwest of Sichuan, Taiwan, south of Xizang, Yunnan, and Zhejiang. Recorded from Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam, Cambodia, and Lao PDR. In Lao PDR it has been recorded in Xiangkhoang Province. Countries - Native: Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria, Western Australia); Bangladesh; Cambodia; China (Anhui, Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu, Zhejiang); Hong Kong; India (Assam); Indonesia (Jawa, Lesser Sunda Is., Sulawesi); Japan (Nansei-shoto); Korea, Democratic People's Republic of; Lao People's Democratic Republic; Malaysia; Myanmar (Myanmar (mainland)); Nepal; Papua New Guinea (Papua New Guinea (main island group)); Philippines; Sri Lanka; Taiwan, Province of China (Taiwan, Province of China (main island)); Viet Nam"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Anhui, Gansu, Guangdong, Guangxi, W Guizhou, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, SW Sichuan, Taiwan, S Xizang, Yunnan, Zhejiang [E and SE Asia; Australia].
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Drosera peltata is occurring in Anhui, Gansu, Guangdong, Guangxi, W Guizhou, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, SW Sichuan, Taiwan, S Xizang, Yunnan, Zhejiang of China, E and SE Asia, Australia.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Wen, Jun

Source: Plants of Tibet

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herbs perennial, forming aerial portion only for a few months during early summer. Stem erect or climbing, branched distally, 9-32 cm, forming a tuber to 8 mm in diam. below ground, glabrous or with black, papillose glands. Basal leaves densely whorled, or absent in some populations, exstipulate, yellowish green to green; petiole 2-8 mm; leaf blade peltate, orbicular to suborbicular, 2-4 × 6-8 mm; some leaves reduced, linear, ca. 2 mm. Cauline leaves alternate, remote, exstipulate, yellowish green; petiole 0.8-1.3 cm; leaf blade peltate or lunate to semiorbicular, 2-3 × 4-5 mm, margin glandular hairy. Inflorescence terminal; cincinnus 2-6 cm, 3-22-flowered; bracts cuneate to oblanceolate or subulate; pedicels 0.6-2 cm. Sepals 5-7, united near base, yellowish green, lanceolate to ovate, 2-4 mm × ca. 1.5 mm, glabrous to glandular hairy, apex 5-7-fid. Petals usually white, rarely pink or red, oblong-cuneate, 4-6 × 2-3 mm. Stamens 5, 2-4 mm. Ovary subglobose, ca. 1.5 mm in diam.; placentas 3; styles 3, 2-5-parted, ca. 0.8 mm; stigma 2- or 3-fid. Capsule subglobose, (2 or)3(-5)-valved, 2-4 mm. Seeds ellipsoid-ovoid to globose, ca. 0.4 mm; venation scrobiculate. Fl. and fr. Jun-Sep. 2n = 32, 40.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

"Herbs with subterranean globose tuber, solid, smooth, about 0.5 cm in diameter; stems erect, 15.3 cm high, occasionally with a branch or two near the top, glabrous. Leaves alternate, many, along the whole length of the stem, with a very slender curved subcapillary petiole 1.0-2.5 cm long; leaf blade peltately attached, semicircular, with the upper edge straight or slightly concave and prolonged at the corners into acuminate horns, thus giving the blade a semilunate outline, carrying on its adaxial surface numerous long, viscid stipitate glands. Inflorescens terminal or lateral, 1-5 cm long, usually 2-8 flowered; flowers white, nearly 1.5 cm across; pedicels 0.8-1.5 cm long. Calyx segments ovate, glabrous but laciniate or ciliate at the margins. Petals white, spathulate-obovate. Ovary globose; styles 3, fimbriate towards the apex. Capsule 7 x 4 mm, ovoid; seeds oblong, black."
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic

Habit: Herb
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Synonym

Drosera lobbiana Turczaninow; D. lunata Buchanan-Hamilton ex de Candolle; D. peltata var. glabrata Y. Z. Ruan; D. peltata var. lunata (Buchanan-Hamilton ex de Candolle) C. Clarke; D. peltata var. multisepala Y. Z. Ruan.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Drosera peltata is close relative of Drosera indica, but differs from the latter in its leaves peltate (vs. linear), stem forming tubers below ground (vs. not forming tubers below ground).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Wen, Jun

Source: Plants of Tibet

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It grows in sparse Pinus forests, scrub, wet meadows, streamsides, sunny open places, and roadsides. It is found from sea level to 3,700 m asl.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

General Habitat

"Habitat and Ecology: It grows in sparse Pinus forests, scrub, wet meadows, streamsides, sunny open places, and roadsides. It is found from sea level to 3,700 m asl. Systems: Terrestrial; Freshwater List of Habitats: 3, 3.6, 4, 4.6, 4.7, 5, 5.8"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

General Habitat

Grasslands
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Sparse Pinus forests, scrub, meadows, streamsides, sunny open places, roadsides; sea level to 3700 m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Growing in sparse Pinus forests, scrub, meadows, streamsides, sunny open places, roadsides; sea level to 3700 m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Wen, Jun

Source: Plants of Tibet

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering and fruiting: December-March
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Flowering and fruiting from June to September.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Wen, Jun

Source: Plants of Tibet

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Evolution and Systematics

Evolution

Phylogenetic relationships among Drosera, Dionaea, and Aldrovanda were inferred from combined rbcL and 18S rDNA sequence data (Rivadavia et al., 2003). This analysis revealed that all Drosera species form a clade sister to a clade including Dionaea and Aldrovanda. The rbcL tree indicates that Australian species expanded their distribution to South America and then to Africa. Expansion of distribution to the Northern Hemisphere from the Southern Hemispere occurred in a few different lineages.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Wen, Jun

Source: Plants of Tibet

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Genetics

The chromosomal number of Drosera peltata is 2n = 32 (Hoshi and Kondo, 1998).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Wen, Jun

Source: Plants of Tibet

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Zhuang, X.

Reviewer/s
Juffe Bignoli, D., Meng, M., Nophasead, L., Khampheng, H. & Homsombath, K.

Contributor/s

Justification

This plant is found throughout a wide geographic range. There is no information on its major threats. Research is recommended to learn more about its uses, population trends and threats. It is listed as Least Concern due to its wide distribution and the lack of major widespread threats.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

"Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1 Year Assessed: 2010 Assessor/s: Zhuang, X. Reviewer/s: Juffe Bignoli, D., Meng, M., Nophasead, L., Khampheng, H. & Homsombath, K. Justification: This plant is found throughout a wide geographic range. There is no information on its major threats. Research is recommended to learn more about its uses, population trends and threats. It is listed as Least Concern due to its wide distribution and the lack of major widespread threats. Conservation Actions: No conservation information on this species. Some research is recommended to study how this plant is utilized, population trends and global threats. List of Conservation Actions: 1, 1.1, 1.2, 3, 3.2, 4, 4.3, 5, 5.1, 5.1.2"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population

No population information available.


Population Trend
Unknown
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population: No population information available. Population Trend: Unknown
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats

No information on its major threats.


Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Major Threat (s): No information on its major threats.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions

No conservation information on this species. Some research is recommended to study how this plant is utilized, population trends and global threats.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Uses

Medicinal
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Drosera peltata

Drosera peltata, commonly called the shield sundew[1] or pale sundew,[2][3] is a climbing or scrambling perennial tuberous species in the carnivorous plant genus Drosera. Among the tuberous sundews, D. peltata has the largest distribution, which includes eastern and western Australia, New Zealand, India, and most of Southeast Asia including the Philippines. The specific epithet is Latin for "shield shaped", a reference to the shape of the cauline leaves.[1] It is either a single extremely variable species, or a complex of several closely related species of uncertain taxonomic boundaries. In Australia at least four forms have had or still have specific taxonomic recognition: Drosera peltata subsp. peltata (an autonym), D. peltata subsp. auriculata, D. foliosa (also as D. peltata var. foliosa) and D. gracilis (also as D. peltata var. gracilis).[4][5]

Tuberous sundews are species of the genus Drosera that have evolved to live in summer drought conditions and aestivate as a dormant underground tuber. While many tuberous sundews are ground-hugging rosettes, D. peltata is an upright species with a simple or branching inflorescence.[6]

Description[edit]

Drosera peltata is a perennial tuberous herb. Its underground tuber is generally found 4 - 6 cm under the soil surface, and its aerial parts range from 5 - 50 cm in height, with wide differentiation into several forms. The subspecies D. peltata subsp. auriculata is often the most robust, reaching up to 50 cm in height, whereas the form known informally as D. foliosa tends to be the shortest, often only 5-10 cm.[7] Drosera peltata generally has an evident rosette of leaves at the soil surface, which is most pronounced in D. foliosa and in contrast often reduced to scales in mature plants of D. peltata subsp. auriculata. The aerial stem is simple or slightly branched in the nominal form of D. peltata, as well as in D. peltata subsp. auriculata, and the form informally known as D. gracilis.[7] Flowers are variable in color, but generally white or light pink. The colour of the plants is also highly variable, with D. foliosa generally bright grass green even when growing in direct sunlight, D. peltata subsp. auriculata often tinged with variable amounts of red (or even solid red), and D. gracilis always orange or dark red colour.

Habitat and distribution[edit]

Drosera peltata is commonly found growing on frost free open flats with light scrub, in areas of regenerating forest, on grassy verges and roadside cuttings. The soil type these plants are found in is mainly soft fine clay or peaty, sand soils, which, while wet in winter, dry out over summer. This species has a large range and various forms occur naturally in southern, eastern and south-west Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand (in Northland) as well as south-east Asia and India.[1][6]

Taxonomy[edit]

Drosera peltata was first described by Carl Peter Thunberg in 1797. Due to its large range and varied habit, D. peltata has accumulated a number of synonyms and infraspecific taxa, including varieties and subspecies. Most subspecies have been reduced to synonymy, but the two taxa that are still considered valid are D. peltata subsp. peltata, which is an autonym, and D. peltata subsp. auriculata, which was originally named by James Backhouse and formally described by Jules Émile Planchon in 1848 as D. auriculata and later reduced to a subspecies of D. peltata by Barry John Conn in 1981.[8] Subspecies auriculata is still considered a valid and separate species by some authorities. The major difference between the subspecies involve seed shape and sepal pubescence. D. peltata subsp. peltata has ovate seeds and the sepals are hairy or pubescent, whereas D. peltata subsp. auriculata has linear seeds and glabrous sepals.[9]

Although demoted to synonyms of D. peltata by Marchant[10] in 1982, the formerly recognised species Drosera foliosa and Drosera gracilis are again treated as separate species by the Tasmanian Herbarium[4] and the Australian Plant Name Index.[5]

Drosera foliosa differs from the nominal form of D. peltata in having a well-defined basal rosette of large, light green lunate leaves, and multi-branched shorter stems. By contrast the nominal form of D. peltata has a less prominent basal rosette, and a single stem. It is mostly restricted to grasslands, herbfields and open woodland with grassy understorey.[4]

Drosera gracilis is similar to the nominal form of D. peltata but smaller and with distinctly red stems and leaves. In Tasmania it is restricted to wet peaty areas, and unlike the winter and spring growers D. peltata and D. foliosa, it grows in late spring and late into the summer.[4]

Cultivation[edit]

Drosera peltata is one of the easiest tuberous Drosera to cultivate, a characteristic that is attributed to its forgiving nature when it comes to water and temperature. The tuberous Drosera typically require wet, cool winters, which is their active growing season, and warmer, nearly bone-dry summers or the dormant tubers will rot. Drosera peltata can withstand wetter summers.[6]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Salmon, Bruce. 2001. Carnivorous Plants of New Zealand. Ecosphere Publications.
  2. ^ "Drosera peltata". FloraBase. Department of Environment and Conservation, Government of Western Australia. 
  3. ^ Erickson, Rica. 1968. Plants of Prey in Australia. Lamb Paterson Pty. Ltd.: Osborne Park, Western Australia.
  4. ^ a b c d Tasmanian Herbarium Flora of Tasmania Online, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery
  5. ^ a b Australian National Herbarium Australian Plant Name Index
  6. ^ a b c D'Amato, Peter. 1998. The Savage Garden: Cultivating Carnivorous Plants. Ten Speed Press: Berkeley, California. pp. 152-157.
  7. ^ a b The Student's Flora of Tasmania. W.M. Curtis. 1967. St. David's Park Publishing, Hobart, Tasmania. Vol. 3, p. 536
  8. ^ Schlauer, J. 2009. World Carnivorous Plant List - Nomenclatural Synopsis of Carnivorous Phanerogamous Plants. Accessed online: 29 August 2009.
  9. ^ Rice, Barry. 2009. The tuberous erect & scrambling Drosera. The Carnivorous Plant FAQ. Accessed online: 2 September 2009.
  10. ^ Marchant NG, Aston HI, George AS (1982) Droseraceae. Flora of Australia 8, 9–66
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Drosera bicolor

Drosera bicolor is an erect perennial tuberous species in the genus Drosera that is endemic to Western Australia. It produces a basal rosette of leaves similar to that of D. peltata and the stem grows to 11 cm (4 in) high. Its white flowers that have a red spot near the petal base emerge from September to October. D. bicolor grows in deep silica sand on heathland along the upper Phillips River and south-east of Lake King.[1][2]

D. bicolor was first described by Allen Lowrie and Sherwin Carlquist in 1992.[3] Lowrie notes in his book Carnivorous Plants of Australia that this species is distinct from other related species, including D. peltata and D. salina, by its bicoloured flowers and the arrangement of its petioles and number of flowers.[2] Some, however, consider this species to simply be a variety or synonymous with D. peltata, though this opinion has not been formally published.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Drosera bicolor". FloraBase. Department of Environment and Conservation, Government of Western Australia. http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/13386.
  2. ^ a b Lowrie, Allen. 1998. Carnivorous Plants of Australia: Volume 3. University of Western Australia Press. pp. 148.
  3. ^ International Organization for Plant Information (IOPI). "Plant Name Search Results" (HTML). International Plant Names Index. http://www.ipni.org/ipni/idPlantNameSearch.do?id=968290-1. Retrieved 5 August 2009.
  4. ^ Schlauer, J. 2009. World Carnivorous Plant List - Nomenclatural Synopsis of Carnivorous Phanerogamous Plants. Accessed online: 5 August 2009.
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

The characters of this species are highly variable.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!