Overview

Distribution

Distribution in Egypt

Nile region, Mediterranean region, Egyptian desert, Res Sea coastal strip and Sinai.

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Global Distribution

Macaronesia, Mediterranean region, eastwards through southeast Europe and southwest Asia to Pakistan and northwest India, South Africa.

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Distribution: Pakistan (Baluchistan, Punjab, N.W.F.P. & Kashmir); Mediterranean region eastwards to Northwest India; South Africa.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Tufted annual 10-30(-55) cm high. Leaf-blades flat or involute, 1-4 mm wide, glabrous below, glabrous or thinly puberulous above; ligule 0.3-0.5 mm long. Panicle densely contracted, very untidy when mature, 3-15 cm long, partially enclosed by the slightly inflated sheath of the uppermost leaf, at length often fully exserted. Glumes unequal, the lower slightly longer than the upper, narrowly lanceolate and long-acuminate, 13-22 mm long, the lower 3-nerved, the upper 1-nerved; lemma ± terete, 5.5-7.5 mm long (including callus), covered on the back with rows of short hairs, dorsiventrally flattened just below the tip, then expanded again at the base of the awn, entire at the tip; callus acuminate, pungent, 1.5-2 mm long. Awns bigeniculate, conspicuously articulated at the base, becoming twisted together at maturity to form a tail at the summit of the panicle, 60-100 mm long; column puberulous with hairs 0.2-0.8 mm long; bristle scabrid.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl. & Fr. Per. March-May (September in Kashmir).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Stipa capensis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Stipa capensis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Stipa capensis

Stipa capensis (Mediterranean steppegrass or twisted-awned speargrass) is an annual grass from family Poaceae.[1]

It is normally found in the Persian Gulf desert ad semi-desert biome.[2] In Persian it is called Bahman and is probably the same plant which was used in the Persian festivity of Bahmanagān.

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.cal-ipc.org/ip/management/plant_profiles/Stipa_capensis.php
  2. ^ Mughal, Muhammad Aurang Zeb. 2013. "Persian Gulf Desert and Semi-desert." Robert Warren Howarth (ed.), Biomes & Ecosystems, Vol. 3. Ipswich, MA: Salem Press, pp. 1000-1002.
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Notes

Comments

This, the only annual species of Stipa found locally, is characteristic of dry stony hillsides and deserts. Specimens are frequently found to have been attacked by a gall (probably Tetramesa stipae Stefani, fide R. B. Benson 1959) which causes a bulbous swelling towards the tip of the rhachis.
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