Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Annuals, 10–40 cm. Stems ± solid. Leaves: proximal blades entire or irregularly lobed, faces ± hirsute and stipitate-glandular. Heads in corymbiform or paniculiform arrays. Bracts subtending heads usually overlapping proximal 0–1/2 of each involucre. Phyllaries ± evenly stipitate-glandular, including margins and apices, with non-glandular, non-pustule-based hairs as well. Paleae in 1 series. Ray florets (6–)8(–9); laminae deep yellow, 2–4 mm. Disc florets (10–)15–18(–21), all or mostly functionally staminate; anthers yellow or brownish. Pappi usually of 8–13, subulate to quadrate, fringed to deeply erose scales 0.1–0.8 mm, sometimes fimbriate crowns. 2n = 24.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G1 - Critically Imperiled

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Wikipedia

Deinandra bacigalupii

Deinandra bacigalupii (sometimes misspelled bacigalupi) is a rare species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common names Livermore tarplant and Livermore moonshine. It is endemic to Alameda County, California, where there are only about five known occurrences around Livermore.[1] It grows in open areas with alkali soils, such as alkali sinks and meadows.[2] This plant was previously included within Deinandra increscens ssp. increscens, but it was separated and elevated to species level in 1999.[3]

This is an annual herb producing a solid stem 10 to 40 centimeters tall. The hairy, glandular leaves have narrow linear or lance-shaped blades with smooth or lobed edges. The inflorescence is a cluster of flower heads each surrounded by the upper bracts on the stem branches. The head contains 6 to 9 lobed yellow ray florets each a few millimeters long and several yellow disc florets with yellow or brown anthers.

References[edit]

  1. ^ California Native Plant Society Rare Plant Profile
  2. ^ Flora of North America
  3. ^ Baldwin B. G. (1999). Deinandra bacigalupii (Compositae-Madiinae), a new tarweed from eastern Alameda county, California. Madroño 46:1 55-57.
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Notes

Comments

Deinandra bacigalupii occurs in the eastern San Francisco Bay area (Livermore Valley). Prior to recognition of D. bacigalupii, plants that constitute the species were regarded as northern outliers of D. increscens subsp. increscens.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Place holder for Deinandra bacigalupii B.G. Baldwin, a new California species published in Madrono 46(1): 55-57, 12/1999. Kartesz (1999, Synthesis) did not address this species or the shift of a group of Hemizonia taxa to the genus Deinandra Greene by Baldwin [12/1999, Novon 9(4): 462-471], likely due to the publication dates. Since all the taxa that Baldwin moved to Deinandra were treated in Hemizonia by Kartesz, D. bacigalupii is provisionally placed here as well.

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