Physical Description

Morphology

Description

20-50 cm, 5-6 cm, pale-blue, white-cream. May.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Type Information

Isotype for Juno vicaria Vvedensky in Ovczinnikov
Catalog Number: US 2999147
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): A. Vvedensky
Year Collected: 1928
Locality: Uzbekistan, Asia-Temperate
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Iris vicaria

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Iris vicaria

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Iris vicaria

Iris vicaria is a species in the genus Iris, it is also in the subgenus of Scorpiris. It is a bulbous perennial.

It was first published by Alexeï Ivanovitch Vvedenski in 'Flora URSS (Flora Unionis Rerumpublicarum Sovieticarum Socialisticarum)' in 1935. Under the name 'Juno Vicaria'.[2]

Iris vicaria is now the accepted name by the RHS.[3]

It is very similar in form to Iris magnifica (another Juno species Iris) with pale violet flowers.[4]

Around 1930, the Russian Government decided to sell various wild bulbs from its lands, to plant collectors of Europe and other countries. Large quantities of Lilium szovitsianum, various tulip species and other bulbs were dug up, transported and sold. A lot of iris bulbs labelled Iris warleyensis were found out to be mis-labeled by American bulb growers. Using Professor Fedtschenko's book,' 'Species of Wild Flowers of the U.S.S.R. they were found out to be Iris vicaria.[5]

It is hardy to USDA Zone 6.[6]

It prefers to be cultivated in well-drained (including sandy) soils containing lime,[7] so that the water does not stay on the leaves. Similar to the cultivation conditions of Iris bucharica and Iris graeberiana.[5]

It can grow in large pots or in the ground depending on the conditions.[8]

Bulbs can be planted in early November, then protected over the winter by a thick mulch, which is scrapped away in the spring. Bulb nurseries lift the bulbs in July after the foliage has died away. Then they are stored in dry, gentle heated room until planting time.[5]

Habit[edit]

Iris vicaria has spherical bulbs and thin vertical tubers.[8] Which can be damaged, when being transplanted.[5]

It produces between 1 - 4 flowers per stem,[9] on visible axils between April and May.[6]

It has varied coloured flowers. Ranging from white with a yellow crest and falls of a very pale blue,[6] to amythest or pale bluish violet standards (with dark veins) and with a yellow crest and yellow blotch.[4][5][10]

It has arching leaves,[5] and can reach a maximum height of between 30–40 cm (12-16").[6]

The seeds are freely produced, and can be easily used to propagate the species, as well as very carefuly, dividing the bulb after several years.[5]

Native[edit]

Iris vicaria comes from the Pamir Mountains and Alay Mountains of Central Asia.[6][10] It can also be found beside the Upper Varzob River,[6] in the Pamir Mountain system of Tajikistan (in the former Soviet controlled state).[11] The mountains' spring thaw provides the year's main water for the irises and other plants in the area.[6] It can also be found in Uzbekistan,[8] Hissar Mountains and Baisun Mountains, regions of Tajikistan.[5]

Known culitvars[edit]

  • Iris vicaria 'Morgiana'[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Iris vicaria Vved.". theplantlist.org. Retrieved 20 September 2014. 
  2. ^ "Iris". ipni.org (International Plant Names Index). p. 143. Retrieved 20 September 2014. 
  3. ^ "Iris vicaria". www.rhs.org.uk. Retrieved 20 September 2014. 
  4. ^ a b Stebbings, Geoff (1997). The Gardener's Guide to Growing Irises. Newton Abbot: David and Charles. p. 75. ISBN 0715305395. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h "(SPEC) Iris vicaria Vved.". wiki.irises.org (American Iris Society). 30 November 2013. Retrieved 20 September 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g "Pacific Rim Native Plant Nursery". www.hillkeep.ca. 12 May 2008. Retrieved 13 August 2014. 
  7. ^ "IRIS VICARIA". plant-world-seeds.com. Retrieved 27 September 2014. 
  8. ^ a b c "Iris vicaria". www.signa.org (Species Iris Group of North America). Retrieved 20 September 2014. 
  9. ^ Cassidy, G.E.; Linnegar, S. (1987). Growing Irises (Revised ed.). Bromley: Christopher Helm. p. 75. ISBN 0-88192-089-4. 
  10. ^ a b "Juno irises J-R". www.pacificbulbsociety.org. 14 April 2014. Retrieved 20 September 2014. 
  11. ^ "Ornamental plants in their natural habitats". mobot.org. Retrieved 20 September 2014. 
  12. ^ "Iris vicaria 'Morgiana'". www.rhs.org.uk. Retrieved 27 September 2014. 
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