Physical Description

Morphology

Description

15-30 cm, 6-7 cm, yellow. May.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Iris bucharica

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Iris bucharica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Iris bucharica

Iris bucharica (also known as Bukhara iris) is a bulbous flowering perennial plant in the 'Juno' section of the genus Iris. Pronounced 'bukh-AR-ee-kuh'.[1]

Named after the city of 'Bukhara' in Uzbekistan, Russia.

It was illustrated in the Curtis's Botanical Magazine, Tab. 7111 on 1 April 1890, and was incorrectly described by Baker as a specimen of 'Iris orchioides'.[2]

It was introduced into the UK in 1902.[3]

Habit[edit]

It is a bulbous perennial.

It grows to 25 cm, with lanceolate leaves, each bulb producing several flowers in spring. The flowers are white standards with yellow falls.[4] The falls sometimes have brown markings and an deep yellow crest. Each flowers stem will normally produce up to 7 flowers. It has blue-green leaves that become glossy green later.[3]

Pure yellow forms are occasionally wrongly labelled as I. orchioides (a different species).[5]

It is widely cultivated in temperate regions.[3] It is hardy to USDA Zones:5-9.[1]

It is fairly easy to grow and will increase (by bulblets) very quickly.[3]

This plant has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[6]

Native[edit]

It is native to the rocky mountain slopes in north-eastern Afghanistan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan around Bukhara.

Hybrid[edit]

  • Iris x ‘Sunny Side Up’

A hybrid of Iris bucharica and Iris magnifica and has yellow and white flowers. It grows up to a height of 50 cm (20"). It is also hardy to Zone 6.[7]

This hybrid flowers in April and May, the fragrant flowers (similar to freesia), are white with yellow blades on the falls. It reaches a height of between 25-35cm (10-14"). It is also hardy to Zone 6. It is also known as 'Iris orchioides f. bicolor'.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Teashon, Debbie. "Iris bucharica". www.rainyside.com. Retrieved 11 August 2014. 
  2. ^ "(SPEC) Iris bucharica Fos". wiki.irises.org (American Iris Society). Retrieved 7 August 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d Buchan, Ursula (28 March 2008). "Iris bucharica: How to grow". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 7 August 2014. 
  4. ^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964. 
  5. ^ "Juno irises A-I". Retrieved 7 August 2014. 
  6. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Iris bucharica Foster". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 2013-05-20. 
  7. ^ "Pacific Rim Native Plant Nursery". www.hillkeep.ca. 12 May 2008. Retrieved 13 August 2014. 
  8. ^ "IRIS FLEUR-DE-LYS Iridaceae (Iris family)". www.hillkeep.ca. 12 May 2008. Retrieved 23 August 2014. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!