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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Dioecious tree to 20 m or more. Leaves alternate, simple; petiole long, slender; lamina elliptic to ovate with an acute apex; midvein prominent. Inflorescences racemose, suberect, becoming pendulous. Male flowers: stamens 20-30. Female flowers: staminodes c. 10; ovary consisting of 7-10 carpels. Fruit a berry.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Derivation of specific name

dioica: with male and female flowers on separate plants; dioecious
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Western Ghats, Cultivated/ Naturalized, Native of Tropical America"
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© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

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Distribution

Worldwide distribution

South America
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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"Tamil Nadu: Dindigul, Nilgiri"
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© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

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S. America.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

Habit: Tree
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© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

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Ecology

Population Biology

Frequency

Frequently cultivated; rare as an escape
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Phytolacca dioica

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Phytolacca dioica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 11
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Phytolacca dioica

Phytolacca dioica, commonly known as ombú, is a massive evergreen tree native to the Pampa of South America. It has an umbrella-like canopy that spreads to a girth of 12 to 15 meters (40 to 50 feet) and can attain a height of 12 to 18 meters (40 to 60 feet). Because it is derived from herbaceous ancestors, its trunk consists of anomalous secondary thickening rather than true wood. As a result, the ombú grows fast but its wood is soft and spongy enough to be cut with a knife. These properties have led it to be used in the art of bonsai, as it is easily manipulated to create the desired effect. Since the sap is poisonous, the ombú is not grazed by cattle and is immune to locusts and other pests. For similar reasons, the leaves are sometimes used as a laxative or purgant. It is a symbol of Uruguay and Argentina, and of Gaucho culture, as its canopy is quite distinguishable from afar and provides comfort and shelter from sun and rain.

The herb is categorized in the same genus as the North American pokeweed. The species is also cultivated in Southern California as a shade tree.

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Source: Wikipedia

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