Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Trees, to 15 m tall, d.b.h. to 32 cm, deciduous. Bark dark gray, irregularly and finely fissured. Branchlets grayish brown in first year, gray and glabrous in second year. Winter floral buds dark brown, cordate-globose, ca. 5 × 4 mm; bud scales lustrous. Leaf buds dark brown, conic, 3-4 × ca. 2.3 mm; bud scales pilose. Petiole pubescent; leaf blade obovate, 2-5.5 × 2-3.5 cm, abaxially with white tufted hairs in veins axils, margin doubly serrate; secondary veins 9-15 on each side of midvein. Inflorescences fascicled cymes, 20-30-flowered. Perianth tubular, 4-6-lobed, margin ciliate. Stamens 4 or 5. Stigmas 2-parted, pinnatifid. Samaras orbicular, broadly obovate, or ± orbicular, narrowly winged, glabrous except for stigmatic surface in notch; stalk ca. 2 mm. Seed at center of samara. Fl. Apr, fr. Jun.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat & Distribution

* Mixed woods. Heilongjiang (Harbin).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Ulmus harbinensis

Ulmus harbinensis Nie & Huang, also known as the Harbin Elm, is a small elm found only in the province of Heilongjang in the northeastern extremity of China, where it occurs in mixed forest.

Description[edit]

A robust, sturdy tree which can reach a height of < 15 m, with a slender trunk of 0.3 m d.b.h. The bark is irregularly but finely fissured. The wing-less glabrous branchlets bear small, obovate, coarsely pubescent leaves < 5.5 cm long by 3.5 cm broad. The wind-pollinated apetalous flowers appear in April; the generally orbicular samarae in June.[1][2]

Pests and diseases[edit]

No information available.

Cultivation[edit]

The tree is very rare in cultivation beyond China.

Accessions[edit]

North America
Europe

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fu, L., Xin, Y. & Whittemore, A. (2002). Ulmaceae, in Wu, Z. & Raven, P. (eds) Flora of China, Vol. 5 (Ulmaceae through Basellaceae). Science Press, Beijing, and Missouri Botanical Garden Press, St. Louis, USA. [1]
  2. ^ "Ulmus harbinensis_EOL". 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

This poorly understood species should be reinvestigated. It may be a hybrid between Ulmus pumila and another species.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!