Overview

Distribution

Anhui, Gansu, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Shaanxi, Shanxi, Sichuan, SE Xizang, Yunnan, Zhejiang.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Trees, to 26 m tall, d.b.h. to 90 cm, deciduous. Bark grayish white, dark gray, or grayish brown, longitudinally fissured. Branchlets purplish brown to tan, glabrous or pubescent, unwinged. Winter buds brown, ovoid-orbicular to oblong-ovoid; bud scales glabrous or finely and inconspicuously puberulent, margin entire or inconspicuously short-ciliate. Petiole 1-13 mm, glabrous or pubescent; leaf blade elliptic, long orbicular-elliptic, narrowly elliptic, obovate-oblong, or ovate, 6-18 × 3-8.5 cm, abaxially pubescent in vein axils or over whole blade, adaxially glabrous and often scabrous, base ± oblique, margin doubly serrate, apex caudate, acuminate-caudate, or cuspidate-caudate; secondary veins (15-)17-26 on each side of midvein. Inflorescences fascicled cymes on second year branchlets. Flowers from floral buds. Perianth campanulate, 4-6-lobed, margin ciliate. Samaras tan to light brown, broadly obovate, obovate-orbicular, orbicular, or long orbicular, 1.2-1.8 × 1-1.6 cm, glabrous except for pubescence on stigmatic surface in notch; stalk shorter than perianth, ± pubescent; perianth persistent. Seed at center or slightly toward base of samara. Fl. and fr. Feb-Apr.
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Ecology

Habitat

* Forests; 1500-2900 m.
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Wikipedia

Ulmus bergmanniana

Ulmus bergmanniana, Bergmann's Elm, is a deciduous tree found across much of China in forests at elevations of between 1500 m and 3000 m.[1]

Description[edit]

RN Ulmus bergmanniana leaf.JPG

The tree is very closely related to the Wych Elm Ulmus glabra; it can reach a height of 26 m with a wide-spreading crown, and a trunk of about 0.9 m d.b.h.[2] The bark is longitudinally fissured, and varies in colour from greyish-white to dark grey. The pubescent leaves range from obovate to elliptic, < 16 cm long, and bluish-green in colour [2].[3] The perfect, wind-pollinated apetalous flowers are produced on second-year shoots in February, followed by generally orbicular samarae < 16 mm in diameter. Branchlets do not possess the corky wings characteristic of many other elm species.

Pests and diseases[edit]

U. bergmanniana has a moderate resistance to Dutch elm disease; in trials [3] in Oklahoma it was also found to be eschewed by the elm leaf beetle Xanthogaleruca luteola [4], but further north at the Morton Arboretum was moderately to highly preferred by the insect. The species is also susceptible to the Elm Leafminer.[4]

Cultivation[edit]

The tree was introduced to the West in 1900. In trials in the USA it was found to propagate well, and also proved to be very winter hardy. There are no known cultivars of this taxon, nor is it known to be in commerce beyond the USA.

Notable trees[edit]

The UK TROBI Champion is a relatively young tree at Kew; planted in 1973, it measured 10 m high by 46 cm d.b.h. in 2010.[5]

Subspecies & varieties[edit]

Two varieties are recognized: var. bergmanniana L.K.Fu, and var. lasiophylla C.K.Schneid..

Etymology[edit]

The species was named by Camillo Karl Schneider for his friend Carl Bergmann, who assisted in indexing the work in which it was published.[6]

Accessions[edit]

North America
Europe

Nurseries[edit]

North America

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ulmus bergmanniana_EOL". 
  2. ^ Fu, L., Xin, Y. & Whittemore, A. (2002). Ulmaceae, in Wu, Z. & Raven, P. (eds) Flora of China, Vol. 5 (Ulmaceae through Basellaceae). Science Press, Beijing, and Missouri Botanical Garden Press, St. Louis, USA. ISBN 1930723407 [1]
  3. ^ White, J. & More, D. (2003). Trees of Britain & Northern Europe. Cassell's, London. ISBN 0304361925
  4. ^ Grimshaw, J. & Bayton, R. (2009). New Trees - Recent Introductions to Cultivation. RBG Kew, London. ISBN 978-1-84246-173-0
  5. ^ a b Johnson, O. (2011). Champion Trees of Britain & Ireland, p. 168. Kew Publishing, Kew, London. ISBN 9781842464526.
  6. ^ Schneider, C.K. (1906-1912). Illustriertes Handbuch der Laubholzkunde. vol. 2. p. 902.
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