Overview

Brief Summary

Biology

The adults can be seen from April until September (2). Both adults and larvae are fearsome predators of other invertebrates. The larvae dig pits, typically on pathways, in order to create a pitfall trap (4).
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Description

This species is the commonest British tiger beetle (2). All tiger beetles are long-legged and fast-running. When disturbed they make fast, buzzing short flights (3). Adults are a beautiful iridescent green in colour with yellowish spots on the elytra or wing cases. Their large eyes and mandibles belie the fact that these beetles are superb predators (4).
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Comprehensive Description

campestrisCicindelaCarabidaePolyphagaColeopteraEndopterygotaPterygotaInsectaArthropodaAnimalia

Cicindela campestris Linne , 1758

Notes

Paleartic. Open habitats. Macropterous, with poliennal larvae. Medium size. Predator.

Rare in the study area (n = 1); recorded in rice field banks only.

  • Pilon, Nicola, Cardarelli, Elisa, Bogliani, Giuseppe (2013): Ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) of rice field banks and restored habitats in an agricultural area of the Po Plain (Lombardy, Italy). Biodiversity Data Journal 1, 972: 972-972, URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.1.e972
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Plazi

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Distribution

Range

This beetle is widespread and common in many parts of Britain (1). It has a wide Eurasian range, and is found from Europe across Siberia to the Pacific Ocean (4).
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Ecology

Habitat

This tiger beetle is always found in sunny sites (1). It occurs in areas with bare ground and little vegetation such as sandy heaths and hillsides, and raised bogs. It is associated with well-draining soils (4).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cicindela campestris

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 9
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

Status

Not threatened (2).
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Threats

This species is not threatened.
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Management

Conservation

Conservation action is not required for this species (4).
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Wikipedia

Cicindela campestris

Mating pair. Male grips female at back of thorax with his (pale-coloured) mandibles

Cicindela campestris, commonly called the green tiger beetle is a widespread Eurasian species of tiger beetle.

Adult[edit]

Adults are 12–15 millimetres (0.47–0.59 in) long. The elytra and thorax are green, varying in tone from light to dark, spotted with cream-coloured patches, and in bright sunlight are somewhat iridescent. The eyes are blackish; the legs are brown with whitish hairs. The antennae are long and straight, not clubbed.

Close-up

Behaviour[edit]

The adults are sun-loving. They live in places with dry soils (sandy or chalky), mostly between May and October at the latitude of Britain. Like other tiger beetles, they run fast on their long legs and are most often seen on bare ground, in Britain typically on heather moorland. They can fly fast, making a loud buzzing noise.[1]

Larva[edit]

The larvae are carnivorous. They dig burrows from where they ambush ground-living insects such as ants.[1]

Distribution[edit]

Cicindela campestris is distributed across Europe from Spain in the southwest to Finland in the northeast. Most records are from the UK, Germany, Austria and the south of Sweden. In Britain, records are mainly from dry sandy or heathy areas such as the heathlands of Surrey, Hampshire and Dorset, and the mountains and moorlands of the Scottish Highlands.[2]

Subspecies[edit]

The species is divided into several subspecies:

In culture and art[edit]

A piece of modern classical music by Stephen Andrew Rawle for clarinet, violin and piano is entitled Opus 43, Cicindela Campestris.[3]

Ecology[edit]

The mollicute bacterium species Entomoplasma freundtii (Entomoplasmatales, Entomoplasmataceae) can be isolated from the green tiger beetle.[4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Chinery, M. page 110
  2. ^ "Encyclopedia of Life". Cicindela campestris. EOL. Retrieved June 13, 2012. 
  3. ^ Rawle, Stephen Andrew (2011). "Opus 43, Cicindela Campestris, for clarinet, violin and piano.". Score Exchange. Retrieved June 13, 2012. 
  4. ^ Tully, JG; Whitcomb, RF; Hackett, KJ; Williamson, DL; Laigret, F; Carle, P; Bové, JM; Henegar, RB; Ellis, NM; Dodge, DE; Adams, J (1998). "Entomoplasma freundtii sp. nov., a new species from a green tiger beetle (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae)". International journal of systematic bacteriology 48 (4): 1197–204. doi:10.1099/00207713-48-4-1197. PMID 9828421. 

References[edit]

Chinery, Michael. Collins Complete Guide to British Insects. Collins, 2005. ISBN 978-0-00-729899-0

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