Overview

Brief Summary

Hemus magalae is a small crab that inhabits subtidal reef rubble. The type specimen was collected from the Pearl Islands, Panama in 2007 at 30m depth from rock and coral reef rubble.

Diagnosis: carapace without lateral teeth; cardiac prominence not elevated above gastric regions; orbits incomplete, unprotected above. Rostrum broad, tips widely separated, minutely developed to either side of broad terminal sinus. Antenna first movable article quadrate, slightly longer than broad. Meri of ambulatory pereopods broad, anterior and posterior margins cristate, concave above, margins strongly denticulate.

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Physical Description

Morphology

Carapace widest at mesobranchial region, little constricted across hepatic region; gastric and cardiac regions with patches of small granules, both equally elevated, mesobranchial region relatively less elevated;hepatic region depressed, mesogastric region bearing cluster of small, hooked hairs; margin of carapace with ridge of granules and fine setae, eight tufts of long setae arranged symmetrically near posterior carapace margin; orbits incomplete, unarmed. Rostrum broad, trapezoidal with ridge of minute granules along lateral border, anterior tips widely separated, minutely developed to either side of broad, shallow terminal sinus. Antenna with fused basal article
bearing large granule visible in dorsal view; first movable article longer than broad, quadrate form derived from strong angular anteromesial, and posterolateral flanges, anterior margin arched, margins denticulate.
Chelipeds slender, chelae distally bent towards carapace front, lacking gape when fingers closed. Both first ambulatory pereopods missing in holotype, remaining pereopods posteriorly decreasing in size; merus broad, dentate anterior and posterior margins strongly cristate, continuous at rounded juncture proximally, marginal denticles rounded, anterior larger, tending to flattened lobes, dorsal surface broadly concave overall, weak longitudinal elevation within concavity along article midline, joining setose tubercle distally; scattered tufts of long setae along and below margins; carpus bearing short posterior marginal flange; anterior and posterior margins of carpus and propodus
with regularly spaced line of rounded denticles; propodus and dactylus with well-developed locking articulation between articles; dactylus curved strongly near acute, corneous tip.
Male abdomen with six free segments and telson, first two segments with sparse, long setae along finely denticulate lateral margins; two to four sets of granules on ventral surface that sometimes overlap proceeding segment, third segment through telson finely granulate, setose; terminal segment broadly subtriangular to rhomboidal, subtruncate
terminally. Entire lateral margin of abdomen fringed with short setae. First gonopod stout with minute
spinules at tip, sparse setae along length.

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© Amanda Windsor

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Type Information

Holotype for Hemus magalae Windsor & Felder, 2011
Catalog Number: USNM 1149374
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Invertebrate Zoology
Preparation: Alcohol (Ethanol)
Collector(s): A. Windsor
Year Collected: 2007
Locality: Islas de las Perlas Peninsula, Panama, North Pacific Ocean
Depth (m): 30
Vessel: Urraca R/V
  • Holotype: Windsor, A. M. & Felder, D. L. 2011. A new species of Hemus (Majoidea: Majidae: Mithracinae) from the Pacific coast of Panamá, with a key to the genus. Zootaxa. 2799: 63-68.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Invertebrate Zoology

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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