Ecology

Associations

Known predators

Mustelinae (weasel) is prey of:
Homo sapiens
Strigiformes
Stercorarius
Bubo virginianus
Buteo regalis

Based on studies in:
Canada: Manitoba (Forest)
USA: Alaska, Barrow (Tundra)
USA: California, Cabrillo Point (Grassland)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • J. Brown, The structure and function of the tundra ecosystem, U.S. Tundra Biome 1971 Progress Rept. 1 (1971).
  • R. D. Bird, Biotic communities of the Aspen Parkland of central Canada, Ecology, 11:356-442, from p. 410 (1930).
  • L. D. Harris and L. Paur, A quantitative food web analysis of a shortgrass community, Technical Report No. 154, Grassland Biome. U.S. International Biological Program (1972), from p. 17.
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Known prey organisms

Mustelinae (weasel) preys on:
Spermophilus richardsonii
Microtus
Spermophilus tridecemlineatus
Thomomys
Leporidae
Microtus ochrogaster
Geomyidae
Spermophilus
Arvicolinae
Sciurognathi
Paridae
Peromyscus
Tamias
Sialia
Junco hyemalis
Spizella passerina
Turdus migratorius
Charadriiformes
Calcarius
Anseriformes
Sciuridae

Based on studies in:
Canada: Manitoba (Grassland)
USA: Arizona (Forest, Montane)
England: Oxfordshire, Wytham Wood (Forest)
USA: Alaska, Barrow (Tundra)
USA: Alaska (Tundra)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • D. I. Rasmussen, Biotic communities of Kaibab Plateau, Arizona, Ecol. Monogr. 11(3):228-275, from p. 261 (1941).
  • J. Brown, The structure and function of the tundra ecosystem, U.S. Tundra Biome 1971 Progress Rept. 1 (1971).
  • J. Brown, Ecological investigations of the Tundra biome in the Prudhoe Bay Region, Alaska, Special Report, no. 2, Biol. Pap. Univ. Alaska (1975), from p. xiv.
  • G. C. Varley, The concept of energy flow applied to a woodland community. In: Animal Populations in Relation to Their Food Resources, A. Watson, Ed. (Blackwell Scientific, Oxford, England, 1970), pp. 389-401, from p. 389.
  • R. D. Bird, Biotic communities of the Aspen Parkland of central Canada, Ecology, 11:356-442, from p. 410 (1930).
  • R. D. Bird, Biotic communities of the Aspen Parkland of central Canada, Ecology, 11:356-442, from p. 383 (1930).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 399
Specimens with Sequences: 446
Specimens with Barcodes: 263
Species: 28
Species With Barcodes: 27
Public Records: 141
Public Species: 24
Public BINs: 24
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Polecat

Not to be confused with Skunk.
For other uses, see Polecat (disambiguation).

Polecat is the common name for various medium-sized mammals in the order Carnivora and subfamily Mustelinae. Polecats do not form a single taxonomic rank; the name is applied to several species broadly similar to European polecats, the only species living natively on the British Isles.

In the U.S., the term polecat is sometimes applied to the Black-footed ferret, a native member of the Mustelinae, and loosely to skunks, which are only distantly related.

Systematics[edit]

According to the systematic theory proposing two subfamilies within Mustelidae, the polecats are classified as:

Subfamily Mustelinae

A more recent classification based on genetic analysis suggests that Mustelidae should be divided into eight subfamilies, one of which is the Mustelinae.[1]

Mustelidae






Lutrinae



Mustela, Neovison (subfamily Mustelinae)




Galictis, Vormela, Ictonyx, Poecilogale (subfamily Galictinae)




Melogale (subfamily Helictidinae)





Eira, Gulo, Martes (subfamily Martinae)



Arctonyx, Meles (subfamily Melinae)





Mellivora (subfamily Mellivorinae)




Taxidea (subfamily Taxideinae)



Note: In much of the U.S. the word "polecat" is almost exclusively applied to skunks.

Diversity and distribution[edit]

Comparative table of the six polecats in the subfamily Mustelinae.

PolecatImageDistributionWeightLength (including tail)
Striped polecatStriped polecat.jpgCentral, Southern, and sub-Saharan Africa0.6-1.3 kg.60–70 cm.
Saharan striped polecatSimilar colouration to striped polecatVarious North African countries0.5-0.75 kg.55–70 cm.
Steppe polecatMustela eversmannii 3.jpgCentral and Eastern Europe, and Central AsiaMales, up to 2.05 kg. Females, 1.35 kg.Males, 32–56 cm. Females, 29–52 cm.
American polecatMustela nigripes 2.jpgSouth Dakota, Arizona and Wyoming, reintroduced into various U.S. states and northern Chihuahua, MexicoMales, 0.65–1.40 kg. Females, 10% smaller.Males, 61–66 cm. Females, 10% smaller.
European polecatPolecat in denmark.jpgWestern Eurasia and North AfricaMiddle European Males, 1.0-1.5 kg. Females, 0.65-0.82 kg.Males, 44–62 cm. Females, 37–54 cm.
Marbled polecatMarbled polecat.jpgSoutheastern Europe to western China.Males, 0.3-0.7 kg. Females, 0.3-0.6 kg.29–35 cm (head and body).


References[edit]

  1. ^ Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Deere, K.A.; Slater, G.J.; Begg, C.; Begg, K.; Grassman, L.; Lucherini, M.; Veron, G.; Wayne, R.K. (February 2008). "Multigene phylogeny of the Mustelidae: Resolving relationships, tempo and biogeographic history of a mammalian adaptive radiation". BMC Biology 6: 10. doi:10.1186/1741-7007-6-10. PMC 2276185. PMID 18275614. 
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Mustelinae

The Mustelinae are a polyphyletic[1] subfamily of family Mustelidae, and includes wolverines, weasels, ferrets, martens, minks, and similar carnivorous mammals of the order Carnivora.

Extant species of Mustelinae

Subfamily Mustelinae

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